Alicia’s nipples are visible through her dress in one scene.


A woman unsuccessfully tries to initiate sex with a man while they’re in bed together. She puts her hand in his pants but he refuses.


Nash tells a woman in a bar that he doesn’t exactly know what he’s required to say to get her to have intercourse with him, but to imagine that he’s already said it. He then talks about fluid exchange.


Nash tells soon-to-be wife Alicia that his directness offends women. She says, “try me,”, and he replies “I find you attractive, and I want to have intercourse with you as soon as possible.” She kisses him twice, and the scene ends.


An infant boy is seen in a bath; his genitals are clearly visible.

In a bar scene, Nash tells all of his friends a plan on how they can all get laid but they do not actually use it.
While married, Alicia tries to arouse her husband in bed by sliding her hand down his chest under the covers. He turns away from her, saying that his medication has ruined his desire for intimacy.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


John Nash, a Nobel Laureate in economics and professor of mathematics, is one of the most famous lunatics today. His crazy and bizarre experience has been widely spread all over the world after being adapted into the film beautiful mind. John Nash was admitted to two psychiatric hospitals, McLean Hospital near Boston in 1959 and Trenton psychic hospital near Princeton in 1961. Between the two admissions, he resigned from MIT whimsically, withdrew all his pension and announced that he was going to travel to Europe. In July 1959, Nash’s flight landed in Paris. He saw the whole city full of demonstrations, strikes and explosions against the nuclear arms race. Until he was finally sent back to the United States, for nine months, Nash wandered around major cities in Europe, full of noise and turmoil under the cold war consciousness like Paris, and the shadow of NATO and the Warsaw Pact wandered around the European continent. The metaphorical wandering in these nine months can not help but remind people of the wandering heroes in the fictional world: the female beggar on the Ganges river that Duras never forgets, Mr. bloom who spent a day in Dublin in Joyce’s works, and of course Odysseus who spent ten years returning home in Homer’s song. Like Nash, these fictional heroes try to achieve some spiritual goal by wandering with endless limbs. Nash witnessed all kinds of crazy world scenes in Europe, which made me curious: how does a schizophrenic who just got out of a mental hospital face a macro world that is more crazy than a mental hospital, especially the macro world, which clearly claims that he is “normal” and “rational”. This question can also be asked in turn: does unprepared modernity and postmodernism make mankind more rational and cold or more intense and fanatical? Are modern people still qualified to isolate some of their own kind and declare: “you’re crazy, don’t get close to us”, even if the boundary between crazy and not crazy has become the embodiment of power? John Nash’s life may be the answer to this question.

I had to write about John Nash I knew, but I couldn’t write. A beginning is a definition, a tone, and John Nash is just difficult to define. During my four years in Princeton, I had many opportunities to know him, “know”, but I didn’t “know”. Each time I knew him, I always overturned the opinion just formed the previous time. Now, these complex facts and feelings overlap layer by layer. I can only point to him and sigh: “look, this man…” all the praise, pity and ridicule, look.

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Then look, look at this man. But he is old. He was 80 years old when I entered school and doesn’t often walk around the campus. It was at the end of my freshman year that I first met John Nash. Before that, I often saw his son. In my freshman year, I found an idle job in the engineering library. I sat in the library for two or three hours in the morning and middle of the night to sweep the borrower’s bar code. The library at this time is always very cold. The students either haven’t got up or have a rest, but a few madmen and fools who live nearby are still. They come as soon as the library opens and make some crazy things. They don’t leave until you ask three or five in his ear in the middle of the night. I remember one of the fat men who always wore loose sweaters and beards. He sat in front of the computer for seven or eight hours. He probably had some kind of very serious epilepsy. Every dozens of minutes, he would suddenly moan uncontrollably, his nose twitching and his feet twisting. He had such a loud attack for about half a minute, and he was all right as if nothing had happened. He has an uncontrollable beast in his body and has to shout about his existence every once in a while. I began to feel terrible until one day, the senior who worked in the library told me that the crazy fat man was the official editor of Wikipedia and reviewed countless entries in front of the computer every day. Over time, I turned a blind eye to all kinds of madness of the madmen who often patronized the library. Gradually, I became less afraid and more close. I heard the dreamy groans of epileptic patients late at night, trance like a lullaby in my mother’s mouth.

One of these library lunatics is 40 or 50 years old, with long, dirty hair and beard. He always wears a Princeton Pullover and lies down in a chair with his legs wide open. In his hand, he puts a thick book, often unopened, on his hand. When he wakes up, he looks straight ahead, and when he sleeps, he tilts his head back as if he were dead. I often see the normal expression of other madmen when they are awake. Only this madman, although he is very quiet, is always in a state of extreme confusion and annoyance. He often sat for a long time, then suddenly violently shook his neck and arms, tightly screwed his eyebrows and nose together, and gasped in his mouth, as if he were experiencing great pain. One day, he was having such an attack. The senior pointed to him and said, “here, this is John Nash’s son.” “What!” I was surprised. “Isn’t his son a Harvard graduate?” “That’s made up by the beautiful mind. Psychosis is a genetic disease.” The senior said with a sneer.

That cruel encounter was the first time I was able to distinguish “beautiful mind” from the real John Nash. Later, I heard some crazy stories about John Nash’s son from my classmates in the mathematics department. It is said that his son often stays in the common room of the mathematics building and writes strange and crazy formulas on the blackboard. One of the widely circulated formulas is as follows:

1 = mercury

1 + 1 = Venus

1 + 1 + 1 = Jupiter

Until he finished writing all the stars he knew, even “Perseus” and “Ursa Major”.

Soon after learning the truth about his son, I finally met John Nash himself. One day at the end of freshman year, I occasionally walked on the road and came across two old people. The men were tall and dry, and the women were short and fat. They were wearing formal clothes and had to attend some ceremony. I recognized the man as Nash and excitedly pushed my friends along. He said, “I saw it.” I asked the woman next to me, “who else? Of course it’s his wife.” I was surprised again. The image was so different from Jennifer Connery’s beautiful wife. When my friend saw me stunned, he was half comforting and half mocking. “I was pretty when I was young, but now I’m old. Speaking of how they were married in beautiful mind, in fact, he was crazy, and soon she would ask for a divorce. For so many years, they lived in the same house, but they had the same relationship with each other. They didn’t remarry until they made a film in 2001.” The two old people walked past us, staggering and silent. They were so alienated, both like strangers and familiar for too many years. The bubble in the beautiful mind created in my mind is so pierced. I just saw a humble old scene of an ordinary old man.

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Fortunately, most ordinary people are encouraged by the bubble of the film. When it comes to Nash, he always thinks of the beautiful mind. Just like many scholars are inspired by the bubble of game theory, they try to add some game theory to their research to catch up with fashion. In recent years, game theory has been very popular at the forefront of various disciplines. I heard Nash’s name in many classes in Princeton. The more fields that seem to be thousands of miles away from game theory, such as biology, comparative literature and history, the more scholars rack their brains to make some relatives with game theory. In those lectures, Nash’s name is always equivalent to “Nash equilibrium”. Only once did I hear the professor talk about NASH in a very different context. It was a lecture on abnormal psychology. “Today I want to talk to you about an interesting case of schizophrenia. The protagonist of the case is the famous professor Nash.” The psychology professor took out a huge old video player and played us an interview on the projector. I still clearly remember the first sentence of the narrator in the interview: “John Nash once suffered from severe schizophrenia, but he insisted that his disease was cured by willpower.”

John Nash once suffered from severe schizophrenia, but he insisted that his disease was cured by willpower. He hated mental hospitals and drugs. So far, he has a palpitation when talking about his wife’s forced him into a mental hospital. He had two admission experiences. The first time he was admitted to McLean Hospital, which specializes in the upper class. Doctors there regard schizophrenia as a mental disease, do psychological counseling all day and ask about his childhood experience. When his colleague Donald Newman visited him, Nash said, “Donald, if I’m not normal, they won’t let me out. But I’ve never been normal…” he was admitted to Trenton mental hospital for the second time. When the interviewer and his hometown revisited, Nash stood on the lawn, stared at the towering dim buildings, and refused to come any closer. “They give you injections to make you like an animal, so that they can treat you like an animal.” Here, he was forced to accept the insulin coma treatment that has been stopped by the Western medical community: high-dose injection of insulin to put mental patients into a coma. When the patient is awake, he looks like a walking corpse. He began to eat only vegetarian food to protest against the hospital treatment. Of course, no one took it back. After a long period of insulin coma treatment, he finally “became normal”. He has never been so modest and polite in his life. “He looked as good as if he had just been beaten,” recalled his colleague’s wife

Six months later, the modest and polite John Nash was finally discharged from the London mental hospital. He changed his dirty patient clothes and handed over his number (he had no name for half a year, only this number identification). He staggered out of the hospital. The first thing he did was to find his childhood friend, “tell me about the things we played together. That treatment erased my childhood memory.”

If returning to reason only means taming social standards and losing memory, how much value does healing have? Especially for NASH, a genius who regards mathematics as “the only important thing”. The purest mathematics in Professor Nash’s mind is not reason, but inspiration. Reason is just a means of communicating this kind of inspiration, and if he regains reason, it also means the loss of inspiration. He is willing to give up reason. A friend visited him when he was in hospital: “when you are crazy, you claim that aliens talk to you. But how can you, a rational mathematician, believe the nonsense of aliens?” Nash replied, “the creativity of mathematics comes into my mind like aliens. I believe in aliens, just as I believe in mathematics.” He wrote in his notebook: “rational thoughts affect a limit on a person’s relationship to the cosmos.”

Shortly after being discharged from the London psychiatric hospital, Nash refused to receive any medication because the treatment made him feel dull and unable to think about mathematics. His former colleagues assigned him an idle position as a researcher at Princeton University. So students often see a middle-aged man in red running shoes wandering around the campus, writing illogical formulas on the whole blackboard, and appearing in a professor’s office with hundreds of mathematical formulas just calculated the night before. He has a nickname, “the ghost of the mathematical building”. Few people know who this madman is.

In the 1970s and 1980s, relatives and friends around him began to notice that Nash was gradually not crazy. His eyes became clear and his behavior became logical. “So how did you recover without treatment?” The interviewer asked him. “As long as I want. One day, I begin to want to be rational.” From that day on, he began to debate with the voices he had heard, refuting those voices, “I reasoned myself out of the unreasonable; I became disillusioned of my illusions.”

“As long as I want.” In Nash’s case, madness and reason seem to become a free will choice. I don’t even believe he’s really crazy anymore; Perhaps he chose madness rationally and returned to reason madly. From this point of view, “beautiful mind” is a serious mistranslation of a beautiful mind. It should be more true as “beautiful mind” or “beautiful intelligence”. Mind has the dual interpretation of mind and mind, but in the process of Nash regaining reason from madness, what we see is that extraordinary will and reason suppress the crazy mind. Or, to be more accurate: from one day in the 1970s and 1980s, he consciously chose to apply part of his madness to the inspiration of mathematics and imprison the rest of his madness with reason.

The videotape of the interview is finished, Professor of abnormal psychology said: “The case of Nash recovering without medication has aroused the interest of many psychiatrists. They study his daily life and surrounding environment, hoping that his case can be popularized. However, in my opinion, what really cured Nash may not be his excellent intelligence and willpower, but honor. In the 1970s and 1980s, game theory developed rapidly in economics, and Nash became famous Long. After he won the Nobel Prize in economics in 1994, he became a lot more cheerful overnight and almost changed himself. After receiving the award, he took a walk in the street. Strangers often saluted him, ‘Professor Nash, congratulations.’ ”

The psychology professor’s comment is not nonsense. When Nash went crazy, he was pursuing the highest fields prize in mathematics. If he could get the fields award in time, he might not go crazy under loss and pressure. Further, honor reduces the scale of social standards. Under the aura of honor, everything becomes beautiful and just. Frenzied behavior is denounced as “Crazy” in normal people and praised as “maverick” in Nobel laureates. So, is it possible that Professor Nash’s madness has not been cured, but that the general public has cured their criteria for judging madness?

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Then tell me a story between Nash and the general public, and what role academic reputation plays in this slow University City. In the spring of my sophomore year, I was elected the chairman of Princeton Mathematics Club by accident. Since then, I have become friends with a group of super eccentric mathematical geniuses. In addition to inviting professors to speak regularly and playing desktop games that require too much intelligence on weekends, the club also engages in three major activities a year: sending teams to participate in the International College Students’ Mathematics Olympics in summer, organizing Princeton mathematics competitions for high school students in autumn, and organizing formal dinners for mathematics professors and undergraduate students in spring. A few days after my new official took office, I was going to have a formal dinner. I was afraid that there were few people and the scene was not good-looking, so I asked the former chairman for advice. He said, “it’s easy to invite professors. You email all math professors and it’s done. As for inviting students, you write on the poster, ‘do you want to see John Nash? Come to the dinner of the math club!’ make sure that countless people come to watch the fun.” I did. Sure enough, many students signed up soon, and many professors said they would participate, but they never received a reply from John Nash.

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