Michel often makes advances toward Patricia, including feeling her buttocks and lifting up her skirt. They later have sex, but it isn’t graphic and the scene is filled with jump cuts.
Female nudity is briefly seen in a magazine and in a photo on a wall.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


In Paris in 1959, the undercurrent of the new wave has gradually surfaced. This year, Jean Luc Godard, the writer of the film Handbook, made his first feature film, exhaustion. As soon as the film was released, it was fiercely criticized by all sectors of public opinion. The critics were so angry that Godard ignored the traditional jump technology. They were also deeply frightened by the mockery of life and nihilism throughout the film. But what can be done?

Godard, like his hero Michelle, doesn’t pay attention to any norms and norms at all.

The hero Michelle is the kind of person who has today and no tomorrow. He doesn’t have a proper career, and doesn’t seem to have any shame and moral concepts. He steals her wallet while her mistress is changing clothes, makes small tricks to rob cars and money, and even shoots and kills the police for no reason… It seems that he has never taken his life seriously, but as an adventure. He kept running, shouting and mocking everything. When one day he was too tired to run, he would no longer exist. The only certainty is that he loves Patricia and wants to go to sunny Italy with her. It was this “only” that became his Achilles’ heel.

Michelle doesn’t like to think and does things only on a whim. In fact, he is afraid to face himself naked. Patricia is different. She has been thinking repeatedly from beginning to end, which is reflected in her consideration of the question “whether she loves Michelle too”. Every time Michelle asked her when she would know, she always whispered, “fast, it means fast!” The first time I saw it, I was completely on Michelle’s side, but every time I revisited it, I deepened my understanding of Patricia. Her hesitation, her coldness, her sweet sadness, and even her final betrayal of Michelle seemed abrupt and unreasonable. In fact, it was so authentic and even empathetic.

One of the favorite plots is in Patricia’s room. She has a long dialogue with the uninvited Michelle intermittently, and the personality characteristics of the two protagonists are displayed incisively and vividly. Not any director can express such rich content in such a narrow space, such a long time period and such a simple character relationship.

Michelle laughed at Patricia’s inner fear, so that “he couldn’t even light a cigarette”, and he was not afraid of anything. This is tantamount to a hint that Godard puts Michelle on the opposite of the real society. He is not even independent or independent, but purely antisocial. Like the news report he said, “A bus conductor stole 5 million francs in order to seduce a girl. He pretended to be a rich troupe manager, and they went to the beach together. In three days, they spent all five million. The man was not discouraged. He said to the girl, ‘the money was stolen. I’m a rogue, but I love you.’ the girl said to him, ‘I love you too.’ The two returned to Paris together… Later, they were caught because he slipped into someone else’s villa to steal. She, she’s still watching the wind outside… She’s so cute! ” This is his life dream. It will never be allowed by society. Patricia is sandwiched between the social and antisocial Michelle. She gasps hard on the narrow plank road, and the two forces make her swing. Therefore, rather than thinking about “love or not”, she is hesitant to choose which world. Finally, she called the police chief and betrayed Michelle to prove that she “didn’t love him”. It’s not that she knows she doesn’t love Michelle, but that she forces herself to surrender to a stronger real society.

Patricia: listen, the last sentence is beautiful. (looking at Michelle) “between sadness and nothingness, I choose sadness”… What about you, what do you choose?

Michelle: it’s stupid to choose sadness. I choose nothingness. It’s not much… But sadness is a compromise. Either it’s all mine or nothing.

The director quoted Faulkner’s famous words, but asked Michelle to give the opposite answer. I really love Godard at this time. At this time, he is still young, sincere, sad and has no direction. What he diligently pursues is a very pure thing. If he can’t get it, he doesn’t want it at all. Paris in 1959 was as young and crazy as him. Michelle swayed in the messy and careless jazz piano, lived his life freely and freely, and hid around his sweetheart. But when he learned that he had been betrayed by the only spiritual pillar he believed in, he had no strength to continue his escape. He said to his companion who came to save him, “I’m exhausted.” He could not die, but he seemed to be deliberately shot by the police, and the camera followed him until he fell on the road and couldn’t get up again. He gently reproached Patricia who came running after him like a lover – “you’re the worst!” He made a mischievous face, then stretched out his hand to close his eyes and died.

On the screen, Patricia’s face was enlarged into a close-up, from which we could see neither sadness nor joy. There was nothing, just an expressionless face. This is reminiscent of the classic expressionless scene of Jiabao leaning on the bow of the ship at the end of the queen of Sweden. The difference is that from Garbo’s calm and elegant face, we can feel her inner sadness and pain, while from Patricia’s face, we can only see nothingness. Yes, between sadness and nothingness, Godard chose nothingness.

报错 笔记

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