One scene shows Barry Lyndon kissing two topless women; the sides of their breasts and nipples are exposed.
Barry’s wife is seen bathing (partially dressed); her torso is mostly exposed, including parts of her breasts, and in one shot her pubic region is seen through the water. Very blurry and brief.
Two men are seen standing naked in a lake, holding hands and professing their love for one another; this is shown from a distance, and the water covers them up to the waist.
Lots of cleavage, including one scene where Barry reaches in between a woman’s breasts to retrieve a necklace.

Barry kisses a man in the mouth right before the man dies in a non-sexual way.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Recently, I took the time to watch children in troubled times again intermittently. This is the fourth time.

The praise and criticism of the film intersect on the film technology: clothing, props, soundtrack, F0 7 lens, candlelight, oil painting like picture… The admirer said: cow! Critics say: formalism! This tendency is consistent with Oscar’s evaluation of Kubrick. “2001 Space Odyssey” gave him a best technology award, while “children in troubled times” was the best clothing, props, photography and soundtrack. No matter Cannes or Oscars, he never won the director and screenwriter award in his life.

When people regard Kubrick as a paranoid detail controller, please think about it. Will a person with his mind make a gorgeous film?

“2001 Space Odyssey”, “clockwork orange” and “big eye opener” have all been plated with amazing forms, but there is a deep connotation matching them under their forms. In the rustic language, it is “the perfect combination of artistic form and creative content”. Like children in troubled times, there is a kind of atmospheric and invisible charm that makes people aftertaste again and again without feeling tired, that is, Kubrick’s own charm.

Under the balanced pastoral composition, retro mood and extremely shallow and soft depth of field of children in troubled times, Kubrick tells a story full of philosophy, which is a life philosophy loved by the people. Russell once said that if you feel unhappy, think about how small a particle you are in the universe, from birth to death, but so. I don’t think this psychological suggestion is feasible. It not only doesn’t let people release their feelings, but increases their fear, because people’s fear comes from the fear of small life. They are afraid that they will be nothing after living for a lifetime. Kubrick’s philosophical story in film language is the same as Russell’s words, but it is much more gentle and comfortable.

The story takes place in Britain in the 18th century. A penniless Irish young man, Raymond Barry, was frustrated in his first love and went away from home. In a few years, through coincidence, luck and his own courage, he set foot on the peak of his life, married a beautiful noble widow, enjoyed all her property and got a beloved son. However, his life is like a parabola. When he reaches the maximum, he slides all the way down until he loses everything and returns to the starting point. But his life and the time in his life can never go back.

Behind this simple and common story is a “human” situation: the relationship between a person and history, the value of secular life to him, and the meaning of his life. There are several narrators and subtitles in the film to explain this “situation”:

Barry’s troops crossed the English channel to fight the “seven-year war” with the French. When the warship braved the wind and waves, the narrator said:

It would require a great philosopher and historian to explain the causes of the famous Seven Years War in which Europe was engaged and in which Barry’s regiment was now on its way to take part. Let it suffice to say, that England and Prussia were allies and at war against the French, the Swedes, the Russians and the Austrians.

At the moment of war, the narrator continued:

Barry’s first taste of battle was only a skirmish against a small rearguard of Frenchmen who occupied an orchard beside a road down which, a few hours later, the English main force would wish to pass. Though this encounter is not recorded in any history books, it was memorable enough for those who took part…

It is well to dream of glorious war in a snug armchair at home, but it is a very different thing to see it first hand…

A war that makes historians argue endlessly and a battle forgotten by future generations means a flickering fate for Barry who was on the battlefield hundreds of years ago. For those soldiers who beat drums and fell with bullets, it means the end of everything.

Barry was lucky to avoid bullets. After that, he was like a surfer, shuttling freely in all kinds of situations, earning both fame and wealth. Barry is far from perfect. He is a vain striver. He is like a grain of dust in history, but he is a great father:

Barry had his faults, but no one could say of him that he is not a good and tender father. He loved his son with blind partiality. He denied him nothing. It is impossible to convey what high hopes he had for the boy and he indulged in a thousand fond anticipations as to his future success and figure in the world. But Fate had determined that he should leave none of his race behind him, and that he should finish his life poor, lonely and childless.

However, “it is destined that his descendants cannot continue the traces of his life.” Barry burst into tears when his young son fell seriously from a horse and lay dying in bed.

Finally, the son for whom he poured all his love and the only connection between him and this eternal and ruthless world died.

The camera suddenly cuts to his son’s funeral, the funeral procession, the small black coffin, accompanied by the priest’s eulogy and a slightly sad grand soundtrack. I am most impressed by this scene in the whole film. I think Kubrick’s warmth is in it, although the perspective of the whole film is cold and alienated.

Barry lost a calf in the final duel and traveled away from home again. He became a lonely and frustrated cripple and a failed gambler. Later, there was no news.

The subtitle at the end of the film reads:

It was in the reign of George III that the aforesaid personages lived and quarreled – good or bad, handsome or ugly, rich or poor – they are all equal now.

Barry’s life has been green, brave, tangled and sad… It doesn’t matter after hundreds of years.

This stereotypical life story is finished, which is not fundamentally different from the article in bosom friend. Perhaps, there is no stereotype in the world. When there are more vulgar people, they become vulgar. It would be great if Kubrick told a stereotyped story with his photography, soundtrack and set. Therefore, we should not underestimate him.

Another underestimation of Kubrick is that many people think he is a reckless art madman, pursuing visual effects at all costs. In fact, although the box office of children in troubled times was not ideal, in general, his films made a lot of money (only the box office, not derivatives such as DVD). The costumes in gone with the wind are exquisite, but in order to save costs, many mass actors in the vision wear paper clothes.

Barry Lyndon

Written for the Screen

Produced and Directed

By Stanley Kubrick

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