• like Young Frankenstein alot of the humor will go over kids heads
  • A group of men perform a sexual song and dance.
  • There is a scene with a roomful of men and one scantily clad woman.
  • There isn’t any nudity. Just jokes and cabaret style outfits. All sex is only implied.
  • Tons of sexual phrases and gestures, however nothing is graphically shown.
  • A few jokes about raping women, but again nothing graphic is shown.
  • A female character performs a dance routine in a cabaret style outfit.
  • Brief Innuendo Will go over kids heads
  • The governor is accompanied by his buxom female secretary who has an outfit that consists of red bras with matching panties, while covered in a loosened luxurious white robe with decorated frilly ends that are both red-fabric and white-fur. The secretary often gets involved with his sex scandals, the governor would do moderate things to her such as resting his head on her bust (which are quite revealing in her bra), and even implied acts such as him later seen shifting his bed curtains open while adjusting his zipper, the secretary (without her robe) also came out of the curtains while still on the mattress asking him to hurry back.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Are you talking to me?!

You Talk To Me?!

With a “bang” shot, the audience shrieked and huddled under the chairs. But… Nothing happened next. Everyone stood up and suddenly realized that it was the picture of the bandits shooting straight at the camera on the screen that confused themselves.

This is the scene that happened when the audience watched the end of Edwin Bott’s famous film “train robbery” in 1903. Perhaps, in those days, baught designed it simply to increase visual stimulation. He didn’t realize the revolutionary significance of this lens – the film is no longer a closed system. Beyond the screen, the characters and audience in the film really began “dialogue”.

Nonexistent lens

Never look at the camera. This is usually the first sentence the teacher tells you in the performance class. Why? Because the audience will find you performing and realize the existence of the camera.

In the golden age of Hollywood, this is definitely a taboo. You know, “watching movies” means giving up yourself and consciously indulging in dreams – which is what “DreamWorks” Hollywood expects. Therefore, they cannot allow any flaw to expose the lie of “dream”. Therefore, the strict “three uniformity” became the necessary law of the film at that time: closed narration, clear time logic and omniscient perspective. They also invented insurmountable axis rules and tried their best to make the audience not confused by the reality in the film. Of course, there is the most important one: never look at the camera, never speak to the camera.

What about the other way around? Like a voyeur discovered by a peeping object, the audience will be ashamed; Will be aware of the embarrassing situation of their third party; The characters on the screen may even form a condescending sense of oppression to the audience; Or turn you into an ally of a conspiracy. As a result, the pleasure disappeared and the dream was broken.

Tease the audience

Mayor Bart cheated everyone out with a “double reed performance”. He said complacently, “Oh, baby, you’re a genius,” and then he looked straight at the camera, “but they’re all fools.”

——Hot saddle

For comedy, the audience’s reaction is more important than anything, so the performer needs an imaginary audience hidden behind the camera (of course, there’s nothing wrong with teasing them occasionally). It is not difficult to understand why the bold practice of breaking the “fourth wall” first occurred in such a non serious field.

This “dialogue” scene first took place in the comedy of the max brothers in the 1930s, and then was carried forward by the more subversive Mel Brooks. However, it is Woody Allen’s Anne hall and John Hughes’ spring is not a reading day that really defines “dialogue” as the feature of postmodern films. In the film, Woody Allen will jump out of the story from time to time and talk about his philosophy of life in front of the camera. From the shadow of childhood, the crisis of middle age to Fellini’s film, there is a lack of cohesion; The bad children who play truant sell their insight that “life is in a hurry, there is no need to waste time in school” – the performers seem to know that the audience will appreciate their sense of humor.

After the baptism of postmodernism, it has become a “conventional” means to ridicule the audience and the film itself.

“The Simpsons”, Homer Simpson pointed to the audience and said: people who go to the cinema to see this film are big fools, especially you!

In Python and the Holy Grail, the actor even jumped out of the plot and said to the audience, “do you think this play will be deleted? We are so worried about the boy who wrote this play, but now we are very happy. This play is much better than the previous one, at least I think so…”

In Jay and Silent Bob’s fight back, Ben Affleck stares at the audience and asks, “who would pay for such a movie?”

Witnesses, or evil allies

“The secret agreement between the audience and the actors was broken,” said erbier Anderson. “When she fixed her eyes on the camera, her happy eyes were covered with panic. She regarded the audience as witnesses and looked contemptuously at the hell opposite to the day she chose. This lens is the saddest lens in the history of film.”

——Godard’s film review of Monica

This is perhaps the most shocking gaze in film history. At the end of the filming of Monica, Ingmar Bergman suddenly decided to insert such a scene: Monica was sitting in a coffee shop, a man politely lit a cigarette for her, gently stroked her chin with his hand, and she slowly turned her head and looked into the camera sadly… This is a bold and too abrupt scene, Contrary to the tone of the film, it will even bring the audience turmoil. But Bergman stubbornly did so. Through “staring”, he threw the moral and emotional dilemma of the characters, including himself (as a husband but in love with the heroine), to the audience.

Therefore, we can no longer safely hide behind the camera. We are forced to share the protagonist’s experience and emotions. A more private connection must be formed. Therefore, it is the several minute monologue in j.c.v.d. that moves people’s hearts so much; Therefore, we have a painful feeling for the tormenting madness in Herzog’s masterpiece Akil, God’s anger… Of course, this connection may also turn us into criminal accomplices. In Michael hanek’s funny game, the audience almost acts as a partner in the murder, and the eyes out of the camera contain showing off Proud and relaxed and naughty when facing the same kind!

Interestingly, at a time when subversion has become the norm, films and dramas in the form of pseudo documentaries such as “office” have sprung up. Actors deliberately peek at the camera while performing, and generally speak to the camera in an interview – the method of breaking the false is used to create another kind of false.

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