One sex scene between two women. Only kissing is shown (albeit quite passionate), and the scene lasts around two minutes. At the beginning of the scene they both take off their shirts; breasts are visible. No other nudity. The film’s score is played over the scene, so not much is heard other than their breathing.
Two women kiss, the scene then cuts to them sleeping with a sheet covering them (sex is implied). Quite brief, and no nudity.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


On October 27, I flew to Adelaide alone and watched the last film festival of Carol. After calming down the excitement of the night, I sorted out my thoughts and wanted to leave my feelings at the moment.

1. Modification of the original work by the film

Most of the film’s modifications to the original work still satisfy me. For example, Therese’s career has changed from stage designer to photographer; Therese contacted carol for the first time, not because she foolishly sent a greeting card, but because Carol left his gloves at the counter; The Christmas gifts exchanged between Therese and Carol have also changed from expensive handbags / suitcases engraved with Therese’s initials to more emotional records / cameras (and countless films). To some extent, these make up for the lack of emotional clues in the original book.

However, with regard to the changes, the dissatisfaction is that the Waterloo advertisement is basically deleted. Carol’s calm and gentle sentence “don’t you know I love you?” What a classic, and the happy long hug the next morning, are gone. Only the phrase “my angel, flying out of space” is retained.

In the part of private detective, Carol didn’t have the brave and firm determination to gamble in the book, only flustered and at a loss. Finally, when competing for the custody of the child, Carol did not give up just because of Therese, but to give up in order to give the child a better life. She enlarged her mother’s identity a lot and weakened her courage to bravely pursue “extraordinary” love. These are not satisfactory.

Speaking of the Waterloo confession, I liked it most in the original work. I read it many times and thought it would remain in the film as it is. Therefore, when I saw the sign of Waterloo, I was very excited. Unfortunately, this paragraph has not been retained. When they were in Waterloo, it was new year’s Eve. After telling each other about chicken soup that they were not lonely because of each other’s company, Kate untied the bathrobe belt, and then bowed her head and kissed Therese. I took a deep breath at the moment of kissing. Although the sex play is beautiful and moving, I prefer the more restrained expression in the original work.

Therese in the original book was very sleepy that day. She seemed to be about to fall asleep. She still looked at Carol bleary eyed. When she looked at Carol, her feelings accumulated to her throat. She opened her mouth and poured out. It was so natural that I was very moved. And Carol is silent and indifferent to continue to pack up. After putting it away, he comes over and presses Therese’s shoulder and gives her a kiss, “then she kissed Therese on the lips, as if they had kissed a thousand times before”. Then Carol says, don’t you know I love you too?

And the next morning, Therese in the movie woke up from bed, saw Carol standing in front of the bed and asked her where it was. Carol said it was Waterloo, and then said, (it was Waterloo,) what a terrible thing, laughing. Here also prefer the plot in the original work. The next morning, Therese bought a newspaper and came back. She saw Carol in the bathroom, so she read her carefully from head to toe. She was very happy that her dream came true. Carol just hugged her tightly and the two hugged deeply, “as if they would never separate again”.

In the book, after confronting the detective, Carol was determined to continue his journey with Therese, but later, forced to go back to solve the problem of custody, he promised to come back to find Therese. Therese stayed alone to work in their separate places, kept talking and communicating with Carol, and waited for Carol. Limited by the length of the film, Carol went straight back without saying goodbye, leaving an old friend (and old lover) Abby to deal with the aftermath, leaving only a letter. It’s a little “scum” to say that you’re looking for the answer to the question because you’re still young. One day you will grow up and find new happiness. At that time, I hope you imagine that I am there to bless you. But we can’t contact anymore Such as this, said very calm and have a sense of distance, appear to be neither sincere nor affectionate, just some beautiful words. The book describes that it is this calmness with a sense of distance that deeply stabbed Therese.

But it was such a fast turning point that we saw the deep feelings of Therese who never said “I love you” in the whole film. Suddenly fell from the height of happiness to the cold ground of reality. Therese was like the backbone was pulled away in an instant. The whole person was embarrassed and lost. Sitting in the car, he ran to the cold wind and vomited more than once. He sat in a trance on the bed, whispered I miss you many times to the phone, developed Carol’s photos in the darkroom, and was distracted

Therese in the book is quite active. Although Carol has been asking her out for dinner and inviting her to travel, Therese has no reservations about her feelings. However, she will never refuse any invitation from Carol, praise Carol unreservedly, express her joy at seeing her, and even take the initiative to say that I love you. But Therese in the film is the weaker side, basically blindly accepting Carol. Carol in the book is so indifferent that when Carol first invited Therese to travel, t refused directly because she thought Carol was just asking her politely. As soon as Carol appeared in the film, there was a provocative feeling in his tone and expression (which may also be the habitual discharge caused by class?), From beginning to end, she was very active and strong towards Therese. Judging from harge’s accusation against Carol at the beginning, he can feel that Carol had a bad heart when he took the salesgirl home at the beginning.

About sex. Therese and her boyfriend Richard in the book had sex for several times, but they were not very happy, so Therese felt it was very wrong (she didn’t feel “no better than this” until she rolled the sheets with Carol), and Carol encouraged t to try more at first. But in the film, the dialogue between T and Richard suggests that t has not had a physical relationship with Richard. So Therese left her best night to Carol, stopped Carol who wanted to turn off the lights and said, “I want to look at you.”. Whether in books or movies, Therese is a person who feels very hard. She prefers to feel and remember the feeling and mood at the moment silently than talking to Carol, even in bed.

The film puts the “I love you” that should have been said in Waterloo to the end. It seems that the director’s intention is to make Therese’s sudden change of heart, which originally refused to live together, more convincing. Because Therese refused, probably because she gave up on Carol before revenge. However, after hearing that Carol finally said that I love you, she began to be haunted and finally went to look for Carol. Hold your breath and stare at each other. It’s so beautiful.

2. About the film itself

    

Apart from the feelings for the original work, the deepest feeling is beauty when watching movies alone.

The soundtrack, tone and shooting technique all have a retro and simple atmosphere. The story is also primary and secondary, basically shooting two women. The rest, such as ex boyfriend, old lover, detective lawyer and daughter, are simplified to the extreme. Even Therese has not interacted with Carol’s daughter in the whole play.

    

What I look forward to most before watching a movie is the silent part. Because before Carol and Therese confess, there is little dialogue in the book. Basically, Carol is talking, while Therese is wandering, feeling and fantasizing about everything about Carol. During the interview, Rooney said that these silences are actually very important, so there are reservations in the film. Although there are few words, it is actually a turbulent undercurrent that promotes the relationship between the two people. So, I’ve been curious about how the film will deal with these silent scenes.

After reading it, I felt that the silence when Carol took Therese to her house for the first time was handled very beautifully. Directly cut Carol’s words and all other noises to the secondary track, as far away as from another world, and the main track is playing slow but happy music. The lens stays on Therese’s face looking out of the window, feeling the world again with a sweet smile.

After the second brush, there was a scene that didn’t pay special attention at the first time, but it was particularly touched this time: after they were found by the detective, Therese threw away the gun and walked back, but saw that Carol had been talking on the phone with Abby in the telephone booth. Her eyes were particularly lost and helpless at that time. I think Therese has always wanted to participate in Carol’s life, to help her share, to buy cigarettes for her in the cold wind, hoping to change her loss of adoption, but she can’t do anything. When something big happens, Carol’s first recourse is still her old lover Abby – she can’t become Carol’s dependence, so is all this just a dew fate. After their first meal, she saw Carol get into Abby’s car and began to laugh. That smile was something Therese had never seen before. At that moment, she was disappointed.

At this time, she felt that it was a clever arrangement for Heins to put the sentence “I love you” at the end of the film. Because Carol had not expressed this feeling before, Therese must have doubted her after Carol left. She couldn’t believe that Carol’s feeling for her was love, not just the spiritual and physical distraction in that fragile period. So when the last two met, Therese’s eyes were never aggressive. There was torture, anger, resentment, and he didn’t admit defeat. When he didn’t want to look at Carol, he was defeated. After Carol said I love you, the close confrontation slowly collapsed. Therese’s eyes became surprised, hesitant and helpless, but before it came to a result, all this was interrupted – for the audience who had not seen the original book, this moment must be very worried.

   

Although I was a little disappointed with the film’s adaptation of the original work and Blanchett’s performance. But I am extremely satisfied with the film itself. The beauty is so good that I laugh unconsciously when I look at it and feel very satisfied. Probably the best thing is music. Before it was released, I felt like I was going to cry when I listened to the music. That feeling is sweet and sad.

In terms of narrative technique, flashback is adopted. The first shot is the two people who have met again after a long separation, but the story itself is introduced. At first, this place didn’t particularly understand his intention. Later, it was popularized to the first place. In fact, the two flight seats are different, which is also a hidden mystery. The seemingly dull meal scene at the beginning reveals the original dark wave at the end. It is said that this beginning pays tribute to “I hate to meet you late” and enters the story from the perspective of a third person. After the second brush, I also felt that it was wonderful for the audience to let the third person slowly lead into the story of only two people. When I got on the bus at Therese, I suddenly remembered the scene of seeing carol for the first time, which made people shocked by rich feelings at the beginning, caught off guard and very nervous.

3. About actors

After reading the book, Blanchett felt like Carol came out of the book. Mature, elegant and mysterious, even the description of appearance is the same: golden curly hair, wrinkles at the corners of the eyes, gray and insightful pupils, and secret sound lines.

So at first, I didn’t think Kate would be the one who let me down anyway, but the result was a little disappointed. Blanchett’s interpretation of Carol, or Heins’s interpretation of Carol, seems to me a little too much. Carol in my mind is gentle and firm, confident but introverted, but Carol in the film is aggressive and careless. Talking in the toy store, pushing a box with your feet, giving Therese gifts and other scenes all have some provocative meanings in them; Even the sentence “I love you” said after the last invitation to live together is not the feeling I want, because the tone is not like missing and worrying, but more like a desperate decision to take out the last chips, with a little self-confidence.

But through the explanation of @ comrade and ordinary Chinese station, I think Blanchett or the director himself probably has another understanding of Carol in the book. Paste Xiaozhan Jun’s comment: “because Rooney plays very soft, Blanchett should play very loud. This catering performance is actually the effect pursued by the director. The feeling of being high above the top is like giving her a strong shell so that she can face the fame and gossip of the outside world. Only in front of Therese can you feel her softness (but it will still maintain apperance). In the last scene, it was very obvious that she talked with a group of men at a high-class dinner, but looked at Therese and the whole person was silent immediately. ”

Maybe it’s not Kate’s acting skills, but Carol in my heart doesn’t coincide with Carol she wants to play. However, the scenes like confrontation with a lawyer, farewell to her daughter, and loss of mind are still very wonderful. Kate, who challenged the lady in distress in blue jasmine, is probably familiar with these.

    

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Kate’s most wonderful performance is the expression of Therese after she saw her transformation in the car after she broke up. Miss, surprise, heartache and many complex feelings are intertwined in the gray pupil full of secrets. The traceless search in her eyes finally led her to give up custody and bravely recover Therese.

What should Carol look like in my heart? I think there is no better illustration than the following picture: gentle, calm and introverted. For me, maybe Blanche

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