Early in the movie a man and a woman have sex, we hear them moaning loudly and we see them from the chest-up having sex in various positions. Pretty graphic.
Upper body frontal female nudity at various times during the film, at times in a sexual context. There is NO graphic (genital) nudity, however.
A brief shot of two completely nude woman hugging and kissing each other on a bed.
A brief shot of a nude woman standing away from the camera, showing her bare buttocks.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


There are essentially only two kinds of truly artistic death: either water or fire.

Ophelia died of water. The depth of water is closely related to the depth of people. For those who drown in their selves, their emotions, their madness, their introspection and chaos, water is their deadly environment. Virginia Woolf, suffering from neurasthenia at the age of 50, sank near her residence in rodmel, Sussex. Sylvia Plath, a sensitive American poetess, committed suicide by driving gas at her home in London at the age of 30: an obscure metaphor. She finally drowned in the flood of her heart. In the context of Chinese culture, when it comes to dying in water, people think of Jingwei, Qu Yuan, Wang Guowei and Shen Congwen’s woman in the legend of Western Hunan. This is another cultural metaphor.

On the other hand, Joan of arc or Bruno could never suffocate in cold and gloomy water, but could only die at the stake. Their lives have become signal lights, lighthouses and torches, shining for many centuries. Because the body is short, the thought is eternal, and the shining entity is the image of the thought. The Dutch Van Gogh with red hair lit up the whole painting world behind him with his twisted starry sky and wantonly stretched Sunflower petals. Jim Morrison’s singing “light my fire” has finally become a myth.

Frieda Carlo obviously belongs to the latter.

Frida, as she said of the pregnant clay doll in the four inhabitants of Mexico, “even if she dies, her body can burst out the flame of life.”

Frida Carlo, Mexico’s most popular modern female painter, was born in the suburbs of Mexico City on July 6, 1907. As a photographer, his father William Carlo is a Hungarian Jew, and his mother Mathilde Calderon is of both Spanish and Indian descent. At the age of 18, Frieda and her boyfriend Alejandro Arias were in a car accident on their way to school. Their bus collided with a tram and several passengers were killed. Frida appeared naked in the iron post – the handrail penetrated her (the handrail was inserted from one side of her body and out of her vagina). A bottle of paint carried by someone sprinkled on her. Her whole body was covered with gold powder, like a statue of pain made of flesh, blood and gold. The crash broke her spine in three places and broke her femoral cap and ribs. The pelvis was broken in three places, the thigh was broken in eleven places, and the right foot was completely flattened. But Frieda miraculously survived and soon was able to live a basically normal life. Pain and perseverance became the absolute theme of her life and works.

Shortly after Frieda returned to the world, she encountered “the second accident in her life” – the combination with mural painter Diego Rivera. At that time, he was 42 years old and weighed 136 kilograms. He had been married twice and had countless affairs. He created huge murals; She is only 22 years old, petite and weak, and her painting can almost be regarded as a miniature easel painting. Frieda’s mother complained about the marriage, calling it “the marriage of elephant and pigeon”. After marriage, Rivera’s infidelity and the cruel fact that she was unable to have children brought her a double blow. Frida became an open bisexual and had many well-known lovers. The two loved each other and hurt each other until Frida died on July 13, 1954 in the blue house in coiocan, where she was born.

In the last few years of her life, Frida was hung on an instrument with a weight of 20 kilograms hanging from her feet. She was locked in iron, leather and plaster corsets (she used 28 corsets from 1944 to her death). She drinks a bottle of brandy a day to relieve the pain. She had at least thirty-two surgeries. From March to November 1950 alone, she underwent six spinal operations; She sewed plaster on the part where the thread had just been sewn. When it began to smell bad, she found that her wound was rotting. Since 1944, she has suffered extreme pain, forcing her to rely on morphine. She had gangrene on her right foot and was amputated from below her knee in August 1953.

But it was Frieda who left us nearly 200 unusual paintings (most of which were self portraits). These works are “as hard as steel, as fragile as butterfly wings, as happy as wine, and as sad as suffering in life.”

Indeed, Frieda’s tortuous life experience itself is a thrilling letter of recommendation. It’s no wonder that although the female painter with eyebrows and a moustache is not widely known in China, she has long become a cultural idol of European and American people: Jean Paul Gaultier calls her “my goddess of art”. Pop diva Madonna admires her so much that she doesn’t hesitate to spend a lot of money to buy the painting “birth” and uses it as a “touchstone” for judging others.

Perhaps it is precisely because of the rich and colorful personal experience that people are always used to seeing Frida’s works as an annotation to the suffering life: the self portrait made in 1926 is a gift to her first love boyfriend Alejandro, and the princess like slender and elegant Frida puts on a sad Botticelli hand in the hope of recovering her lost love; A few pinches is based on a real news event. A man hacked his wife to death with a knife. When asked by the judge why he did so, he replied carelessly: “it’s just some small wounds.” But this painting was painted shortly after Rivera had an affair with Frida’s sister Christina, so it is actually the true expression of her inner pain. The famous “broken spine” is obviously the best portrayal of Frieda’s life. She depicts herself as a saint with an iron corset integrating St. Sebastian and the lamenting virgin. The original place of the spine is filled with an Ionian column split into three sections, and her life is shattered by unexpected disasters.

Even Frieda’s still life paintings are considered to reflect her life. We were told that the painting of “cut fruit” shows her aggressive sexual desire and the trouble of fertility, just like the monkeys in her self portrait, even if she just regards them as pets (obviously, the pet dogs she often paints do not have this connotation).

Julie tamer’s 2002 film may not be the most in-depth or characteristic of all the miscellaneous biographies about Frida, but she is obviously wise in dealing with this problem. When Frieda in the film said that his paintings were not worth a lot of money, “they only mean to me”, the director pointed out through Trotsky with the sensitivity of his female artist: “no, Frieda, people are lonely and painful, and your works undoubtedly bring them a light in the dark.

When analyzing the works of artists, Chinese people often emphasize the need to “know people and talk about the world”, and there is no lack of mechanically copying. They stubbornly understand the works of art as an allusion to history or a ridiculous example of the author’s life experience. Now it seems that this is a universal axiom. From Michelangelo to Van Gogh, from Dante to Rambo, it seems that an artist must experience all kinds of hardships and express them implicitly behind these works. Truth and martyrs are equated. Such a stereotype seems to be particularly obvious in female artists. People like to regard them as female models of calm and suffering: the name of Marietta robusti, the daughter of the Renaissance Venetian painter Tintoretto, has been handed down to this day, not because of her immortal works, but because of her tragic death. 19th century artists rewritten the genius as “a person suffering from tuberculosis. Before dying, she also inspired her father to reach a new height in art.” The sculptor Camille Claudel is well known as Rodin’s lover and a victim of family apathy. Similarly, when people talk about rock singer Terry Amos, they are more interested in her unfortunate experience of being raped by her friends in her early years than her obscure alternative songs.

Understanding artists’ life may help us better understand their works, but life experience is by no means the whole behind their works; Biographical works about artists are like wreaths laid on their tombstones. They lead us to great artists, but they can not really reproduce the spiritual power of dead artists. This power should be found in the artist’s work itself. What makes young and ignorant children concentrate when they hear Mozart’s music, and what makes blonde european gentlemen and ragged African old women cry for Romeo and Juliet? Like all great artists, Frieda’s works should not only be autobiographies, but also have a larger theme.

The film’s depiction of the major events in Frieda’s life is tepid and just right. But the director never missed any chance to show his talent. The video is exquisitely conceived and brightly colored, and the film is filled with a breath of surrealism (Frieda was almost included in the movement, but she never admitted that she was a surrealist), such as the description of the car accident that changed Frieda’s life.

According to the witnesses present at that time, it was a strange, slow and almost silent car accident. The tram couldn’t stop and crushed the side of the bus bit by bit with the plasticity of nightmare. In the film, before the accident, Frieda had long watched Rivera’s mural “Genesis” – the man in the middle of the picture stretched out his arms to show sacrifice and dedication – but was pulled away by Alejandro, which became a metaphor for Frieda’s life. When Alejandro persuaded Frida to take the next bus, she pulled him to catch up quickly – a sad desire to throw herself into the arms of her destiny. At the moment the tram hit the bus, a green bird fluttered from a top hat passenger and flew through the chaotic carriage – a symbol of uncertain fate?

In addition, the analysis of works such as broken spine and two Fridas in the film is also impressive. It’s just that the director turned the sentimental gesture of saving his lover in the self portrait in 1926 into a sincere invitation to Rivera, which made me a little confused. But from the perspective of film plot development, this is understandable.

It is worth mentioning that the original sound of the film with strong Mexican style is also worth listening to, especially the ending song burn it blue, which is composed by director Julie tamer. To some extent, it is similar to Don McLean’s memory of Van Gogh’s masterpiece Vincent.

Seeing this, Frieda will probably smile at me with her well-known cynicism. After all, I’m light hearted, so I might as well end this article by quoting scriptures at the end. The following is part of Susan Sontag’s discussion of Simone Wye. To some extent, the same argument seems to apply to Frida Carlo:

Our cultural heroes in liberal and bourgeois civilized society are anti liberal and anti bourgeois; They are a group of highly exposed, fascinating and anti civilization writers who often give people the impression of cultural violence – not only in their voice of personal authority and the passion of intellectuals, but also in their paranoia of extreme personalization and extreme intellectualization. We live in an era of conscious pursuit of health, but it is also an era of recognition of morbid diseases. The truths we fear are those closely related to painful experience. We measure truth by the degree of suffering – not by whether the writer’s text conforms to the truth. Truth and martyrs are equated.

Aside from some superficial phenomena, it is necessary to realize why we read and praise writers like Simone Wye. Simone Wye has won tens of millions of readers for her works and essays published after her death, but I believe that only a few of them can really share her thoughts. There is no need to share Simone weii’s suffering from Catholicism, her unfulfilled love, or to accept her Gnostic theology about the absence of God, agree with her religious ideal of abandoning the flesh, and agree with her hatred of the extreme injustice of Roman civilization and Jews. A similar situation also exists in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. Most of their followers do not understand them, let alone take their thoughts as creeds. We read sharp remarks because of their personal authority, their serious model, their strong willingness to devote themselves to their truth, and – only a few people – because of their “views”. Just as asibid, the traitor, followed Socrates’ footsteps, although he was neither able nor willing to change his personal destiny, he aroused a touch and satisfaction in the depths of his consciousness and filled his heart with love; It is in this way that a sensitive modern reader pays his respect to a spiritual level that is not owned by him or impossible for him.

When we pay tribute to such a kind of model figures, we also recognize that there are mysterious things in the world – and such mysterious things are the opposite of the reliable grasp of truth (an objective truth). In this sense, we will think that the real world is only a superficial phenomenon, and some (incomplete) deformation of truth, a certain degree of {but not all} madness in life, a certain degree of {but not all morbid,} a certain degree of {but not all} abandonment creates truth, provides another set of standards for psychological and physical health and improving the realm of life.

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