We see the buttocks of a boy. This is in two scenes, the second of which is somewhat extended and shows rear nudity for multiple boys.
We also see a very, very, brief glimpse of a young boy’s genitalia from behind. It’s so brief that it’s much easier to miss completely than to catch.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Ken Lodge’s 1970 masterpiece “children and Eagles” is definitely an important work connecting the past and the future for the history of British film. It started from the British free film movement in the 1950s, carried forward the independent and sharp characteristics of the free film movement, and echoed the documentary spirit of John glelson, the leader of the “British recording film school” in the 1930s. After rebellion, British films returned to the documentary tradition, completed a transcendence and realized a transformation. If the label of the previous free film movement was “new”, then Ken Lodge labeled it another label “Britain”. It can be said that the “new British film” was officially born here.

The story of “children and Eagles” takes place in an ordinary town. Like many other British towns, the town is developed by relying on the coal mines here. The vast majority of people in the cities and towns rely on this for a living, and then the next generation takes over from the previous generation and continues to dig coal. This is a place where the working class gathers. It is not surprising that Ken Lodge, who started making a TV Political documentary in his early years, set his second film here. The setting of this “industrial town” can be found everywhere in subsequent British films. For example, the famous six heroes of the light pig focuses on a declining industrial town, and six unemployed men have to make a living by dancing stripteases. Of course, the humor and satire belonging to the British people alone dilute the heavy proposition of dignity and value, and imply the “industrial loneliness” of modern people struggling in the torrent of changes in the times. Ken Lodge will not discuss “industrial loneliness”. He focuses on “big themes” such as politics and class differences. The greatness of children and eagles is that he uses an extremely simple story to present these “big themes”, and uses an ordinary little boy to tell the pain and hesitation of a generation. The great changes in British society in the 1960s were put into this simple story by the director. Isn’t the pain and sadness of little boy Billy the pain and sadness of this country at the moment?

Family is an present but absent existence in Billy’s life. His father’s departure, his mother’s disregard and his brother’s beating and scolding reflect the “lack of meaning” of the family to Billy. There is a metaphor of “decline” between the father’s absence and the declining factory. The brother who works in the factory is undoubtedly the representative of the “lost generation”. He is dissatisfied with his work in the factory (complaining when he gets up in the morning), but he has no intention of changing another job. While resisting this declining “empire”, they are living on its existence. The once “empire of never setting sun” is declining rapidly, which is a “lack of meaning” for everyone living in it. I can’t help thinking of John Ford’s masterpiece green mountains and green valleys. The background of the film is also in an industrial town, but the director has changed to an American. “Green mountains and green valleys” sings the main melody of family, love for hometown and relatives. Even if life is unfair to me (my brother and father died in mine accidents one after another), love can overcome all this. The mines in “green mountains and green valleys” give people the feeling of endless life, just like the green mountains and green waters, full of an American style “idealism”. And to the British, the decline of mines and the disintegration of families have long lost the warmth of “Pastoral”. Not only the family, study and life is also a “nightmare” for Billy. There is a long play in the film. Billy participates in a football match and has no money to buy a Jersey, which makes the PE teacher very dissatisfied. In the following game, the once defeated football player wanted to find glory in the students. When a child commits a foul, he says it’s a penalty. If he doesn’t score, he also says that the goalkeeper moves in advance and wants to play again. His malicious foul was considered a reasonable collision. Billy didn’t hold a shot from the other side and let the “Manchester United team” represented by the teacher lose the ball. He held a grudge, forced the thin Billy to take a shower in the dressing room and deliberately opened a large amount of water. This section is chilling in Ken Lodge’s documentary and silent scenes. The audience can’t help feeling Billy who has nowhere to hide in the cold water. Coincidentally, the hero in another British film “jump out of my world” is also named Billy. He also lives in a declining industrial town, but Billy Eliot is much better lucky. He was infatuated with the ballet of “girls only dance” since childhood. Although it was not acceptable at the beginning, when his father saw Billy’s persistence, he decided to support him at all costs. In this film, his father, brother and teacher are all the boosters for Billy to drive to success, helping him step by step to success, jumping out of the closed mining town and opening up his own world. Billy in children and eagles is also looking for his own blue sky. Billy, who had no sustenance in this empty town, caught an eagle, stole an eagle training book from the bookstore and began to tame the young eagle. Eagle training has become a top priority in Billy’s life. Ken Lodge constantly hinted at the closed environment and repressive living atmosphere of the town in the film. Billy’s constantly climbing fences, factory chimneys, narrow streets, dense houses… Billy can only sit on the grass and look at the factory, or sit in the classroom and concentrate on the small world outside the window. In the closed world, Billy can only look up and see the blue sky when he trains eagles. In addition to the hints of fences and other objects, there was another time when Billy was told by the farmer that he had crossed the border and could not go any further when he went to catch an eagle. This clearly expressed the meaning that Billy could not escape from the closed world.

I believe every audience can interpret the meaning of the eagle to Billy. I think the eagle is a combination of freedom, life and hope. The eagle is the sustenance of love in this cruel and closed world. The eagle is free, even if it is locked in a cage. As Billy said, “the eagle cannot be completely tamed”. In the eagle’s heart, only the broad blue sky is its belonging. The eagle is the only existence with life color in Billy’s hopeless life. The soaring and diving of the eagle again and again is the publicity of vitality. I believe that every child contains strong vitality like an eagle, but this vitality is bound to wither after deprivation of freedom. In a story, the enemy questioned Che Guevara, “the freedom without life you choose is not real freedom”, Guevara retorted, “the life without freedom you choose is not real life”. Life is built on freedom. What life is without freedom? Man is just a walking corpse. No wonder Pei Duofei wrote the poem “both life and love can be thrown away” for freedom. The free film movement in Britain not only refers to the “freedom” in the way of film creation, but also implies the film’s resistance to the traditional dogma and the behavior mode of imprisoning people’s thoughts. The exchange of master and servant identities in Joseph Rossi’s servant is undoubtedly a naked declaration of war on the traditional class view. Similarly, in Lindsay Anderson’s “if”, the conflict between students and teachers finally evolved into an armed revolution enhanced version of Jean Viggo’s “conduct zero”, and the new generation finally chose force to resist the old system. The growth of Britain’s “post-war generation” in the 1960s directly gave birth to a subculture revolution by subverting the values of the mainstream middle class. Ken Lodge’s suggestion in children and eagles is quite clever. Billy and several classmates were found smoking by the teacher. Ken Lodge changed his documentary style. Here he gave a close-up of cigarettes on the teacher’s desk. When the teacher kept repeating those rigid rules, several students kept laughing behind. The confrontation between new and old values is cleverly presented here. Although there is no bloody conflict like that in if in this remote town, this contradiction is indeed growing secretly. In this scene, although Ken lodge “accidentally” chose to intervene, the play still well reflects the director’s documentary style. When the teacher teaches the students, the students and the teacher are in the foreground, the window of the teacher’s office is in the middle view, and the grass outside the window is in the foreground. In this play, there is a person walking in the foreground. Although the character is very small, because the teacher and students are relatively still, a moving thing suddenly appears in the picture, which must distract the audience’s attention, but this character has no meaning to the film at all. If it were in other films, such a “Gang shot” would not normally appear, but Ken Lodge chose to be true to the end. When you think about it, such a “Gang shot” is similar to Godard’s play in which mass actors compete for the leading role in exhaustion, but Godard wants to emphasize that “the film is false” and Ken Lodge wants to say “the film is true”.

The meaning of “Hope” carried by the eagle is very obvious in the middle of the film. Billy’s English teacher saw Billy’s ability to tame eagles. The lecture on Eagle training in front of the whole class made Billy find self-confidence in the curious eyes of the students. Billy’s life seems to be going in a good direction. But Ken Lodge is not Stephen Dudley, and the characters in Ken Lodge’s films are rarely divorced from their own destiny. In children and eagles, Billy took the money his brother asked him to bet on horses to buy Eagle feed. Unexpectedly, the horse won the race, but his brother didn’t get the money, so he brutally killed the eagle. In sweet sixteen in 2002, Lyme hoped that his mother, who was imprisoned for her father, could start a normal life with herself after she got out of prison, but the result was that her mother returned to the villain’s father. Happiness is in front of you, but it’s just untouchable. Ken Lodge’s film is more “real” than “destiny”. For the marginal people living at the bottom, this is life. In the last scene of children and the eagle, Billy buried the eagle silently, as well as his hopes and dreams. In this “climax” paragraph, Ken Lodge did not sensationalize at all, but calmed down to almost harsh, reminiscent of the scene in which his brother shot his brother in the wind blowing wheat waves, which topped Cannes in 2006. This is what a wise director should do. He should replace sensationalism with reality and empty emotions with grief directed at the hearts of the people.

“Children and the eagle” is such a simple film, but it is recognized as the most important British film since the 1960s. Ken Lodge used his candid camera language to transcend the pain associated with despair, but engraved the sadness of that whole generation.

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