A man is seen naked from the rear.


A woman is forced to perform a striptease in front of an audience of men. The scene lasts for under half a minute. She takes off the top of her dress, revealing her breasts briefly. She then turns around, completely removing the dress. She then takes off her panties, and marches right off stage (only her back is seen once she turns around).


A woman wakes up in bed with a man.


A married woman is seen in bed with another man; sex is implied.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


One afternoon this summer, the mobile video Museum showed Nashville. This time, it is no longer amazing for Altman’s careless line and laying ability.

Just like seeing Guling Street on the big screen after watching DVDs many times, Nashville has changed from a spectacle to a personal memory for me.

I am most cordial to the little character “Joan of Los Angeles” played by Shelley Duvall. Maybe it was the first time Shelley and Altman cooperated. She was thinner than later. She was still a teenager. She was heartless and knew only how to dress up. She went back to Nashville to visit her aunt in hospital, but when she got off the plane, she ran out to play East and West, The old uncle chased after her, and she didn’t see her until her aunt died. And she said, “don’t call me Martha. Everyone calls me Joan in Los Angeles.”

Everyone used to be a problem teenager who let adults have no way and thought he would be reborn after going out of the door.

Most of the time, the film is noisy. Not only the crowd actors speak, but also the election car plays political declarations all the way. This is Altman’s consistent ambition: to imitate life itself rather than set a filter. So some quiet moments attract special attention.

For example, the heartbreaking story of the prodigal son (almost everyone is pitiful and sad). He is Tom in bill Mary, a trio who visited Nashville, similar to the well-known Peter, Paul and Mary in the 1960s.

Bill and Mary are husband and wife, but Mary loves Tom like other female fans. One morning, Mary lay in Tom’s arms and kept saying I love you rhythmically. Tom smokes without expression. Mary has a typical Hippie face of the 1970s, with long withered yellow hair, a tight face and no expression.

Tom also got a flower crazy BBC reporter (played by Chaplin’s daughter) before. But he seemed most interested in Linnea, a local singer who had met once, and kept calling her. One night at the music bar, all three women were present. Tom came on stage to perform a new song called “I’m easy”, a sad melody and real lyrics. Of course, the three women who didn’t know about it felt that Tom was singing to themselves. (this song unexpectedly won the Oscar original music award that year!)

That night, Linnea went to the hotel with him and had to go home to take care of her son and husband in the middle of the night. Tom played cheap. When she combed her hair in the toilet, she called another woman. Linnea seemed to understand the temper of these boys. Before leaving, she kissed him on the forehead and said goodbye to him kindly.

The fierce old woman with a thick throat, the wife of the godfather of Nashville Music, said everything like a firecracker. Only when she talked about supporting Kennedy’s election as president when she was young, her eyes were filled with tears and her throat choked. She couldn’t go on, like talking about old lovers.

There is also a man who has no lines and rides a long and strange motorcycle through various scenes, sometimes causing a group of actors to talk a word or two, and sometimes carrying the main characters. Shortly after the beginning of the film, the main characters’ cars were blocked on the highway by traffic accidents, but his car can skillfully pass through the rear end array and disappear.

After the shooting scene at the end of the concert, the microphone was accidentally passed to Babara Harris, who always wanted to be a singer and repeatedly ran into a wall. She stood on the stage tremblingly, but sang bravely and finally led the chorus. Like I’m easy, this song was written by Keith Carradine, who played prodigal son Tom. The atmosphere was much grander, called I don’t worry.

“It don’t worry me none, it don’t worry me, you may say that I ain’t free, but it don’t worry me”

In the song, the camera swings up, crosses Nashville’s iconic imitation Parthenon temple, election slogans and American flag, and ends in a blue sky.

In addition: two actresses Karen black and Barbara Harris in the film appeared in his last film the year after Nashville was screened.

Hitchcock theater, a suspense TV series produced by Xipang in his later years, once asked young Altman to be the director. After shooting two regular plays, Altman reportedly had a disagreement with the producer and quit the job.

In the 1990s, Altman made the player, which talked about the background of Hollywood film industry. There was a scene on the set. The line of a mass actor was like this: “you know, my father used to work under Hitchcock.”

I don’t know if it’s the original words of Altman’s son Steven in reality. Steven is a stage set designer. He designed the old house in Gosford manor with his father.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here