Sex is implied once but not shown. No nudity either.


Young men are seen frequently only wearing their shorts. A number of scenes where a young man undresses or stands around partially-naked, though only his chest and legs are visible.


A young couple kiss. They are in beachwear and the man is bare chested.
It is suggested a young couple have sex in a boat cabin, though their efforts are disrupted. The most obvious reference offcurs when they are seen without clothes, whereas previously they had been fully clothed (the woman shields her breasts with a towel/jumper held close to her chest). It’s also implied another young man was trying to watch/listen.
A young man is seen in his underpants. There is a close-up of his crotch area as he walks towards the screen (with some brief outline detail) though this is not overtly sexual.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


This is a cold and elusive film. We are familiar with the novel of Ripley the genius and the version of Anthony mingra, but the French lightness and ambiguity injected into the story by Rene Clement’s angry sea and dead body is still strange.

Patricia hesmith’s novel “Ripley the genius” was published in 1955. At first, it was only regarded as a pure entertainment book. Later, people realized that the degenerate fantasies in the book could be understood as the post-war American version of the count of Monte Cristo, or at least let the post-war Americans feel the deprivation and unlimited desire of Tom Ripley.

The sinking of the corpse in the angry sea is a story beyond moral judgment. Tom Ripley, a clever and cunning American “Diner”; Philip Greenleaf, an arrogant and annoying playboy, started out as an unequal friendship full of mischief and ostentation, but then the story went straight down to “get rid of your own desires”, identity theft and murder. But it must be noted that – our “anti hero” Tom Ripley is by no means a devil, nor a sample for psychiatrists to analyze clinically. He just paranoid wants everything to be the best – but it must be at the cost of deceiving or destroying others. At the end of the novel, Ripley’s victory points out a truth: you can get everything you want, as long as you are willing to kill and smart enough to cover up the crime.

We can’t help but compare the genius Ripley with the dead in the angry sea. Anthony mingra takes great pains to join Ripley’s grief and describe his incomparable desire for crime, while Rene Clement doesn’t seem to care much about Ripley’s motivation. He is more precise and calm and keen to show off the techniques of genre films. Perhaps by the standards of the current audience, “dead in the angry sea” is too light, elegant but difficult to empathize. Not as straightforward as Ripley the genius shows all cruelty, jealousy, irresistible desires and crazy calculations.

“The dead in the angry sea” fully shows Rene Clement’s delicacy and delicacy as a technical director. Half of the video is the world observed by Ripley’s glasses. It is calm, but the sun is gorgeous. The Italian scenery in the portable lens is full of fluidity. The other half clung to the Hitchcock theme, and the camera from behind seemed to suggest that Ripley had no regrets for what he had done. If Rene Clement really wants to explain the story and Ripley’s psychology, such a large number of close-up shots seem to reveal the clue. The handsome appearance of young Alan Delong and the charming eyes flashing under his eyelashes make Ripley more like a character in Bresson’s films, naive and stubborn, bent on dealing with the injustice of the world.

Not surprisingly, the video ignores the homosexual desire implied in the story. The charming but empty rich boy dick in the original (and the mingra version) becomes the spoiled and annoying Philip in the video – he’s looking for death. The relationship between Ripley Philip and his fiancee Maggie seems to inherit the emotional wandering and uncertainty in French films. You can understand it anyway.

Finally, the dead body in the angry sea changed the ending of the novel. When Philip’s tugboat was pulled ashore, his rotten body surfaced along the rope entangled with the propeller. Even so, Tom Ripley came to the police like a winner.

The dead in the angry sea is a film of decisive significance to Rene Clement’s directing career. Clement first entered the film industry as a photographer, and then he made some documentary short films and the documentary style film railway fighting team (1946), which promoted the “French resistance”. His initial reputation as a master of realism was brought about by the game of taboos (1952) and the careful adaptation of Zola’s original book the life of a woman in the laundry (1956). However, taking “the dead in the angry sea” as a turning point, Clement began to abandon the image way of pure naturalism and advocating humanistic spirit and began to explore deeper human nature (perhaps therefore, Clement was attacked by his new wave colleagues).

But interestingly, the documentary experience has always influenced Rene Clement’s creation. For example, the paragraph in which Ripley killed Philip was shot impromptu. Clement said that he can feel that every actor has “understood” the plot, so there is no need to write them out to let the actors play their best along with their emotions. As a result, the play was short but full of explosive force.

Patricia hesmith:

Train Freak (1951) directed by Hitchcock, this Agatha Christie style meticulous story has become one of Hitchcock’s most successful works.

American friend (1977), directed by VIM Wenders, adapted from Ripley’s game, the second part of Ripley’s series.

Tell him I love him (1977), directed by Claude Miller, adapted from the novel sweet nausea

Madness (1987), directed by Claude Chabrol, adapted from the novel owl’s cry. Chabrol made Franz Lang’s cold black style one of his representative works to analyze the distortion of fate.

Gifted Ripley (1995) directed by Anthony mingra.

Ripley’s game (1999), directed by Liliana Cavani and directed by John markovich, is much more typed than this version.

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