SEX: Naked man and woman lie next to each other on a bed in a post-coital scene. Later, they are together and he asks her to tell him her sexual history. She tells him how many men she slept with and other details; she then sits in his lap and gradually begins thrusting. Four implied sex scenes. Man lays on top of woman, both entirely naked, and begins thrusting to completion and rolls slightly off her.
NUDITY: Much more explicit female nudity than male. Explicit female nudity includes full frontal and full rear nudity with pubic hair. Explicit male nudity includes only bare chest.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


If I didn’t come here purposefully, but unexpectedly found myself standing in this place… It would be a bit of despair—— Kafka, Castle

Only kieslovsky can make fate so easy. The song of opportunity shelves the irreversibility of time, selects nodes from the vast time axis, and discusses the inevitable result caused by the accidental experience of life – the rising aircraft, the sudden explosion and smoke. Life is hijacked by chance, tossing and turning, making choices, but the result still can’t escape fate. Isn’t this our most tragic sigh about the nothingness of life?

one

The song of opportunity was shot in 1981. It is in the transition period of Kieslowski’s thought. His film style is changing from emphasizing the description of external reality to suggesting internal diversity, from the open political field to the field of psychology or metaphysics. However, the political appeal infected by him has not completely disappeared. As kieslovsky later expressed in an interview with French television, “people who have been in contact with communism, whether they believe in or oppose it, or have no attitude like me, have been infected by it and can not be cured”. It should be said that it was impossible for kieslovsky at that time to forget politics and history.

Although song of opportunity and short working day edited at the same time cut off the path of the film directly to political reality through jumping editing and illusory reverie, and even “time” replaced politics itself as a yardstick to measure political behavior, the political incitement of the two works is not weak at all. We can see that politics is not only a lingering plague attached to individuals, but also a prop and background for creating accidental events. The campus purge movement in 1968 and the ensuing workers’ strike and anti Semitic movement mentioned in the song of opportunity have become the key nodes to determine the direction of wittek’s order movement.

Weiteke dropped out of medical school because of his father’s death and the loss of his sense of mission. At the same time, young people in Poland were aware of the hypocrisy of the government. The government incited students to hold demonstrations in order to antagonize the people and intellectuals. So they were confused, lost their faith and uncertain about their future. There were only three choices in front of them. The film presented these three choices to the audience in the way of Witek catching the train.

In the first story, weitek caught the train to Warsaw, accepted the guidance and recommendation of veteran party member Werner and became a member of the Polish Communist Party. He believed that the social reality could be improved through the cooperation between individual and system, so weitek went to the hospital on behalf of the Communist Party to mediate and try to stop the “rebellion” of militants. The director narrated all kinds of details in the mediation in a joking tone. In fact, he was implying weiteke’s embarrassing situation. He enthusiastically participated in the political party and tried to realize his political aspirations, but he became a scapegoat for the government to suppress the people. Since then, due to the arrest of his girlfriend, weiteke clashed with his boss and had to leave Warsaw for Paris. However, when he came to the airport, a strike broke out in Poland, and he was told that he could not leave the country.

In the second story, weiteke failed to catch the train but offended the station guards. He was sentenced to compulsory community service and met the activist Marek. At the latter’s invitation, he joined these anti-government and anti Communist underground groups and received religious baptism (Stefan is his priest). At the same time, he fell in love with his childhood partner’s sister Vera. Ironically, Vera was married and Jewish. Around 1968, a protracted anti Semitic Movement broke out in Poland, and Vera was forced to emigrate. At this time, the desperate weiteke wanted to go to Paris to attend the meeting and leave Poland. However, he had to report the whereabouts of underground groups to the government to obtain a visa, so he still failed to make the trip.

In the third story, weiteke didn’t catch the train, but met Olga, a female classmate of medical school, so he went back to school, got married and had children. He refused to join the party, and he also resisted religious and anti-government organizations. He was a favorite student of the dean of the medical school and went to Libya to attend academic conferences instead of the dean. However, in order to celebrate his wife Olga’s birthday, he changed his flight and had to take a connecting plane through Paris. It is worth noting that at the airport, the director captured two key scenes for the audience. One is the female flight attendant with documents in the first story, and the other is Stefan in a wheelchair in the second story, who is also waiting for the same flight. In other words, weiteke will take the plane that should have taken in the first two stories. However, tragedy happened. As described at the beginning of this article, the plane exploded and crashed shortly after taking off.

In the first two stories, the protagonist is politically inclined, either into the centralized rule of Eastern Europe shrouded in Stalinism or into the embrace of Western left-wing liberalism. However, the result is always contrary to his wishes, and he is inevitably marginalized. In the third story, the protagonist no longer has any political beliefs. When he happily lives a “happy” life of the middle class, the hourglass of fate turns over again. The end of the film tells the audience that even if individuals try hard to get rid of their political will, the final result will inevitably be involved by innocent people. This kind of despair about Polish politics after World War II can be found everywhere in kieslovsky’s early works (personnel, the brand of life, etc.). Kieslovsky once said, “no matter from the individual or symbolic point of view, you can’t find a place that really belongs to the individual in Poland. Maybe you will have a vision for some ideals, but it will always conflict with the superficial and despicable social reality.” From this point of view, the song of opportunity may be regarded as the concentrated expression of kieslowsky’s political ideal and his persistent attempt to “break through individual destiny to political will”.

two

The greatness of song of opportunity lies in its transcendence of the boundary and position of time in the form of images. The film breaks the inherent order of time, establishes multiple narratives under the “if… Then…” conditional assumption structure, and presents an image rhetoric that seems to be “rhetoric” but actually has a delicate layout. In the film, the director borrows the symbolic symbol of the machine age, the train, to construct an imaginary time tunnel, Reset each time node through the action of the protagonist chasing the train. This rhetoric was imitated by many later film works (such as Laura run, sliding door and butterfly effect), which skillfully deconstructed the clock time in the machine age for several times.

Referring to the idea of the song of opportunity, kieslovsky said: “How many contingencies can I be here today? When a person chooses one road, in a sense, he also chooses the contingencies that may be met on this road; while on the other road, there are other contingencies. In order to understand my current position, we must go back to the past, observe the past process, and see what is the necessity of taking this road and what is self By will, what is out of chance. ” In the film, Kieslowski repeats the hypothesis of “if not” three times through three juxtaposed stories. Through the three “if not”, we see that individual subjective factors determine the fate of individuals. For example, in the first story, if weiteke didn’t beat his boss, even if a workers’ strike broke out, he could go to France as a party representative; In the second story, if weiteke takes the initiative to expose the secret printing base, he can directly obtain a visa to France from the official; In the third story, if weiteke didn’t attend the medical meeting instead of the teacher, or if he didn’t celebrate his wife’s birthday, the tragedy wouldn’t happen.

However, weiteke in the film once lamented his luck to his girlfriend. When his mother gave birth to himself, his twin brother died. If he gave birth to his brother first, he would not have his own existence. It seems that “luck” is more important. It is worth noting that at the beginning of each story of the film, there is a scene of weiteke running from the ticket counter to the end of the train. In this process, there will be several elements such as rolling coins, beer drinkers and patrolmen. Obviously, in the western context, the coin tossed means contingency and probability, and the randomness of the coin dropped affects the time when the drunk picks up the coin to buy wine, and then interferes with weitek’s running path. In fact, through this series of linkage, the director links whether the protagonist can catch the train with a random event such as coin tossing. This example shows that the fate of an individual is not determined by the individual’s subjective initiative, but depends on accidental objective events, and the trajectory of life is more like fate.

From the end of the film, between “man will conquer heaven” and “destiny”, kieslovsky pessimistically chose the latter. If the former emphasizes a kind of Western invincible subjectivity, which is the “I think” in Descartes’s eyes and Hegel’s “absolute spirit”, then the latter belittles human subjectivity and believes in the inevitable tragedy of individual destiny dominated by chance, with a mysterious fatalism. At the end of the film, the director magnifies the contingency leading the individual fate infinitely, creating a shocking scene, destroying all previous efforts and possibilities, which is extremely cold. The spring toy section in the film can be called the strangest echo to the end of the film. When weiteke saw the tubular spring toy “independently” climb the stairs with the help of gravity, his eyes showed surprise and inconceivable. However, once it fell to the bottom of the building, the spring that lost gravity would be like dead. Weiteke pointed to the still shaking spring and said, “look, it’s a dying struggle.” As everyone knows, all his attempts on the road of life are just a dying struggle.

three

In the song of opportunity, kieslovsky, on the one hand, preaches contingency and future uncertainty, telling the protagonist that his own characteristics / identity / identity are changing and can change. But on the other hand, he still circles the protagonist into a dead circle. Those different characteristics / identities / identities given by chance exist, but people with different characteristics / identities / identities will eventually come to the same end, a certain, doomed and long designed abyss. By displaying the possibility of three choices, kieslovsky materialized those uncertain assumptions, which rejected any nostalgic possibility of standing at the moment and indulging in historical contingency, and told us that there was no need to cry “if I had been, I would be now” with the resentment, regret and reluctance of “time does not treat me”. History will not give any comfort to individual luck. It will run over everyone’s body, and everyone without exception will leave a run over trace on the ground. No matter what the shape of your trace is, it will turn into dust when a gust of wind blows.

In fact, kieslovsky is not a natural pessimist, but the current situation of human existence itself is full of contradictions and paradoxes. Today, there is still a great controversy about where to place the individual in the society. In the social network jointly compiled by morality, ethics, religious belief and political will, “individual” is often frightened, suffering and in a dilemma. Isn’t the fatalism and despair shown in the song of opportunity our living reality?

Kierkegaard said that choosing despair is not to escape life, but to break the closure of human survival and complete the breakthrough and Transcendence of human survival dilemma. Nowadays, those people who distort the postmodern spirit with hedonism and deconstruct the plight of mankind have made us lose the ability of evaluation and reflection, lose the minimum moral bottom line, and become a simple and insignificant social existence. Kieslovsky’s pessimism, “let humanitarianism not be a vulgar sensationalism or cheap optimism, or even a kind of tolerance or warmth. It carries the most basic attention to the plight of human survival. It is a pain, an ultimate defense line, and a pessimistic but not desperate arrogance.” (Liu Xiaofeng, heavy body)

2010-8-13 20:25 originally published in Li · Zhi

Postscript:

After writing this article, when I read Zizek’s law of the unconscious: on an ethics beyond the good, I suddenly found that the three “choices”, or possibilities, provided by the song of opportunity are based on the philosophical discussion of ethics.

In Zizek’s expression, there are three choices: providing a direct ontological basis for ethics through some basic concepts of supreme good (selective communism); Save the former by sacrificing the essential content of the universality of ethics and making a procedural turn to the universality (dissidents); And the “postmodern” attitude. Its essence and all inclusive only rule is “don’t impose your own game rules on others’ games”, that is, maintain the diversity of narrative games (maintain an ambiguous attitude of neither negation nor affirmation towards any political opinions).

These three choices form Hegel’s syllogism: directly based on the basic ethics of the supreme good itself; Then its “opposite”; Finally, it is the “negation of negation”, the postmodern negation of universality itself. We find the contradiction of the third choice itself. In fact, it may become a subspecies of the second position, imposing a second level formal rule, that is, to accept intractable differences with tolerance. Lacan’s position on this syllogism led to the birth of a new “choice”, that is, “an ethics of giving a traumatic real world that rejects symbolization, which is experienced in the abyss of desire with the other.” In essence, the song of opportunity is an ethical interpretation of the real world, trying to fill the cracks in the ontology building. Zizek calls it “assigned loyalty”. In my opinion, it is a kind of hasty filling.

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