A woman strips naked for a man, and he looks her body over with pleasure. We only see her shoulders and up.
A woman goes skinny dipping, and we see her bare buttocks and her breasts. Her husband then arrives, he looks her over, and she gets out of the lake. They start kissing and hugging, and sex is implied.
It is implied that a man is trying to seduce his slave.
A scene at the Roman bathhouses where Roman men are swimming and bathing.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Antoninus (Tony Curtis, passion like fire, taste of success), Spartacus’s future right-hand man, was originally a slave of the Roman noble Crassus (Laurence Olivier). The play in which he bathed his master was deleted when it was first shown, and the DVD was restored. Oliver’s lines about eating oysters or snails are the famous little gay code in the history of film.

The whole scene was shot with a fixed stand overlooking slightly. The whole process was panoramic without close-up or close-up. There was a Tulle curtain between the camera and the bath. Crassus sat, Antoninus behind him. The soothing background music with the slow sound of water is a little mysterious and provocative.

Crassus:Do you steal. Antoninus?

Antoninus:No.Master.

C:Do you lie?

A:Not if I can avoid it.

C:Have you ever dishonored the gods?

A:No.Master.

C:Do you refrain from these vices out of respect for the moral virtues?

A:Yes. Master.

C:Do you eat oysters?

A:When I have them,master.

C:Do you eat snails?

A:No.Master.

C:Do you consider the eating of oysters to be moral and the eating of snails to be immoral?

A:No.Master.

C:Of course not. It is all a matter of taste, isn’t it?

A:Yes. Master.

C:And taste is not the same as appetite and therefore not a question of morals, is it?

A:……

C:Hmm?

A:It could be argued so,master.

(out of the bath)

C:My taste includes both snails and oysters.

If you don’t understand it from the perspective of gay, the lines of this bathroom play are inexplicable and completely irrelevant. If you understand it from the perspective of gay, it is carefully designed, not only about these two characters, but also about the whole film; That’s why it’s too small gay. So no matter how it is deleted, it is not wronged at all.

(open the curtain and go to the outer room)

C:Antoninus,look. Across the river. There is something you must see.

(from the perspective of Antoninus, Crassus looks out of the terrace; under the terrace is a big blue river, and on the other side of the river, a group of Roman soldiers march in line along the river)

C:There,Boy,is Rome. The might, the majesty,the terror of Rome. There is the power that bestrides the known world like a colossus. No man can withstand Rome. No nation can withstand her. How much less a boy! Hmm? There’s only one way to deal with Rome. Antoninus. You must serve her. You must abase yourself before her. You must grovel at her feet. You must…love her. Isn’t that so. Antoninus?

(at this point, Crassus turns around and Antoninus is gone)

Simplify the blockbuster Spartacus to the extreme and omit the civilian side (Gracchus played by Charles Laughton [hunter’s night] and prosecution witness), which is the line dispute between Spartacus and crassus. Who can win the freedom, democracy and equality in the United States and the Golden Pyramid like aristocratic rule in Rome? In historical subjects, who lives and dies is not the director who has the final say, but to see who can get love and who can not get it.

Varnia (Jean Simmons, great prospects, Hamlet), the female slave Crassus loved, became a woman of Spartacus, and it’s not enough to have children for him; Antoninus, the male slave he liked, also turned to Spartacus and remained unchanged until his death. Crassus’s defeat was twofold. He won the war, but he became the loser in the film.

In the two scenes repeated above, Crassus wants to fully conquer Antoninus and preach to the latter from two layers. In the bathroom play, Crassus tries to convince Antoninus to love women or men. It’s only about taste, not appetite, but also morals. The latter is nothing but a solipsist. In the next scene, Crassus seduces the latter to devote himself to Rome as power itself, intoxicating himself. Instead of paying attention to this remark, Antoninus chooses to leave.

After Spartacus was defeated, he and Antoninus were both captured. Crassus asked them to duel. The winner will be crucified the next day. Dying with a sharp weapon is much more merciful than dying slowly on the cross. Both want to kill each other. Antoninus was stabbed and said, I love you like my own father. Spartacus looked into his eyes and answered, I love you, like a son I never met. Then they hugged each other tightly, their cheeks pressed together until Antoninus stopped breathing.

In ancient Greece, the theory of love between tutors and teenagers was not common enough. It should be said that it was institutionalized. Kubrick’s handling of “great friendship” is both subtle and sophisticated. His dehumanizing tendency is also emerging in the role of crassus.

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