No nudity, but a bunch of woman in Jabba’s palace are seen dancing in scantily clad clothes. Lasts for a couple minutes.
Princess Leia is seen inadequately dressed for a while. You momentarily get a peek at her buttock and breasts from a few angles. No nudity whatsoever


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


It’s been a long time coming, post it. There may be some fallacies in it.

Main article.

Here’s what happened: the movie had started while I was sitting stupidly outside the cinema. I hurried in in the dark and saw Anakin Obi-Wan and Count Dooku in the middle of a battle in front of me. In a cluster of empty seats I pondered and picked the middle seat to sink into, ready to enjoy a personal scene of self-indulgence. But I wasn’t the only one who looked foolish, then the sound of voices brought a geezer in a Benelux Star Wars T-shirt (Master Yoda) – oh no, this is a small town, geezers with homemade lightsabers don’t greet the final rites in places like this – and the visitor was a geezer who was more than a match for me. The visitor was a young man not much older than me, holding a preschool boy in his arms, and they rested their butts on the left-hand seat in the same row as me, turning my individual session into our little group session …… During the film screening, the man occasionally whispered explanations for the child on his lap The man was occasionally whispering explanations to the child on his lap, and the child was asking the same professional questions such as ‘Is that man the Black Knight? I was distracted from the personal experience of the film and realised that there was already a successor to the Star Wars culture.

The Force and Space Opera – 32 years of the Star Wars saga

Text/yakumo=Crow Cry Demon

Before this article was born, I was faced with the Star Wars Pombo material and hesitated how to cut through it, when I came across a quote from George Lucas, the creator god of Star Wars, who said: “For someone like me who writes and directs, the narrative in the film is my life, and what I write is a little bit of everyday life, I don’t write those fictional stories, because without two or three years I don’t write fictional stories because you can’t finish a script without two or three years, so the stories I write have to be relevant to me, I can’t just spend a week on it because I find it interesting, it’s like getting married, you have to love each other for four or five years first, maybe for the rest of your life.” It is well known that Star Wars has occupied Lucas’ life for 32 years, from his first draft in 1973 to 2005 when Star Wars Prequel III brought the epic to a close, the story of Star Wars is as relevant to his life as the two sides of the coin. So this essay will begin with Lucas’ teenage years and attempt to look at the full spectrum of Star Wars and Lucas’ story.

Outside the Star Wars Era

The world has never been short of prophets, from Christ and his disciples to Nostradamus to Jules Verne and even to Harry Shedden, whose eyes looked straight ahead at every move in the future and were widely talked about for a distant time past, yet few are considered competent historians, and it seems that the reason for this is because the human eye is born in front, so the scene behind them is more difficult to discern.

As the walnut faded in front of the teenager’s eyes, it was unclear to the teenager exactly what had happened in the crash that had just taken place. George Lucas, like the boys of his time, was pursuing his dream of Formula 1 racing with abandon, until he had a vision of a walnut tree that cycled through the life process of flourishing and fading before his consciousness faded. An ambulance comes to the rescue of the dying high school graduate-to-be, and although his heart has stopped, the teenager has a surprising brush with death. This reminds me of a magical phenomenon in Tibetan Buddhism known as vasanas, which refer to classics that are hidden away when a religion is struck by a catastrophe and later rediscovered, and are divided into book collections, sacred collections and knowledge collections. It is said that when a classic or a mantra cannot be passed on, it is hidden by a deity in the depths of a person’s consciousness so that it will not be lost. When the conditions for retransmission became available, by some mystical revelation, the person who opened the vasanas was able to recite them into a record. Then Lucas woke up anew, and the Sense Collection made him a historian with an understanding of the twists and turns of the ancient galaxy.

Having experienced major changes in his life, Lucas was convinced that some mysterious force was protecting him, until the idea of ‘FORCE’ developed in Star Wars, and he was able to build the complex world of Star Wars based on the belief that everything is spiritual. People are as unprepared for the turn of events as they are unpredictable. After the accident, Lucas changed overnight from a rambunctious teenager to a different person with an extreme obsession with books and stories, reading a great deal of science fiction and drama while in his hospital bed, and being heavily influenced by the TV series Flash Gordon. Discharged from hospital four months later he enrolled in a local prep school in Modesto, California, and in 1963 enrolled in the film department of the University of Southern California, when the door to the future began to open gradually for the young man.

Francis Ford Coppola, the famous American director, was Lucas’s mentor in college. Under Coppola’s tutelage, Lucas made the 30-minute black-and-white short film THX1138, which became the prototype for the 1971 film THX1138. After graduating in 1969, Lucas and Coppola teamed up in San Francisco to form American Mirror Pictures, but THX1138, an adaptation of the student short, was a commercial failure. It was a commercial failure. The hit was followed by American Graffiti, a light comedy about teenage life in small-town America in the 1960s, which grossed $145 million and won an Oscar for only $780,000, and the image of a skate-clad hotel waitress stuck in the minds of fans. Well, with this confidence boost, Lucas pulled out a 13-page draft and started running to the beginning of the Star Wars mythos.

Four years before the Star Wars era

The first draft, completed in May ’73, contained many strange characters and place names, a significant number of which did not make it into the final draft. George Lucas took this “nonsense” script, The Mace Windu Story, to his agent Jeff Borg, who replied, “George, it’s good writing, but where’s the script for the sequel to Americana that I wanted”. With his help Lucas later revised the script extensively, adding elements of film and literature, including the legend of King Arthur, popular popular adventure novels, the film master Akira Kurosawa’s The Warlords and even Jung’s psychoanalytical theories. One of Lucas’s greatest influences was Joseph Campbell’s The Hero with a Thousand Faces. As Lucas says of Star Wars, which originated in his own real life, Coppola’s character in the film is mapped onto the mercurial and humorous prodigal son Han Solo, the captain of the Perpetual Falcon, and for Lucas, who has always loved mystical philosophy and comparative religion, Joseph Campbell, who is his spiritual mentor, is the equivalent of a Yoda master. According to his words: “When I started making the film, I wanted to make it a modern myth. I took anthropology and social sciences as my major courses at university. I also took a mythology class and read Joseph Campbell’s books. When I started writing the Star Wars script, I started doing research, and Joseph Campbell was a deep influence on me. After that, I created the Jedi. A friend gave me a video tape of Joseph Campbell’s speech and I was shocked that he was more powerful when he was giving a speech than when he was a writer. From then on we became friends and I met with him until he died. He was a spiritual mentor to me for a long time and he was fantastic scholar and person. I was lucky to be with him.”

Joseph Campbell argues that modern society is in turmoil and that such turmoil is due to the fact that modern man finds life meaningless; that life is meaningless because man has abandoned the myths that give it meaning; that myths go hand in hand with science and are acceptable to modern man; and that by accepting myths, life has meaning and peace is restored to society. The “heroic adventure” is what he considers to be the archetype of myth: the hero ventures out into the world of everyday life, into the realm of supernatural wonders, where he encounters fantastic powers and wins a decisive victory; the hero then returns from the mystical adventure with the power to give gifts to his fellow man. The standard path of this heroic mythic adventure is precisely the amplification of the ritual codes of growth. The father and son protagonists of Lucas’s Star Wars, Anakin and Luke, both recount such adventures, the difference being that the father is tempted by the darkness and fails, while the son continues down the path to eventual victory. Lucas has truly translated Joseph Campbell’s theories into his own cinematic dreams. Not only does he want to prove himself a successful hero in reality, but he also wants to project this in the mythical dream that is Luke Skywalker. Luke is just a tweed for Lucas High, the heroic archetype ends up being the director himself.

A second draft of the script came out, which had been called The Adventures of Luke the Starkiller before it was officially titled Star Wars.

Lucas was shut out of Universal and United States with a script that today does seem very much like personal YA. But he was relieved by the refusal of Universal, who had inexplicably cut scenes at the end of his last collaboration on American Style Picture. He then approached Alan Ryder of Twentieth Century Fox’s production department, who was not originally in Lucas’ consideration, and after hearing the bizarre outline, he took a shine to the script. He told Lucas, “I don’t really understand the film, but I believe in you as a person, and I know you’re a guy of immense talent. It’s not you as a script that I’m investing in this time, it’s you as a person.” Alan Ryder proved to have an uncanny eye.

After finding a partner he then conquered the calculating directors at Fox with concept art by concept artist Reeve McRae, and the tightly clenched hands of his wallet shelled out the $8 million budget. But the story was too long, so he decided to bring 1/3 of the original plan to the screen first, and the finicky Lucas made a point of having control of the remaining two parts in his contract. In 1975, the Star Wars project was finally set in motion. Faced with the demise of the studio’s special effects department, he set up his own visual effects company under the name of Industrial Light and Magic. It is now fair to say that it was Industrial Light and Magic’s technology that made Star Wars possible and changed the future of Hollywood. He did not listen to his friend Coppola and decided to cast all new people in order to save costs. Mark Hamill, who plays the important role of Luke Skywalker, has only previous experience in television, and although Luke has the air of an American farm boy in today’s eyes, he is a far cry from his father Anakin’s youthful look and feel. For the important female role of Princess Leia, he picked Debbie Reynolds, the leading lady of Singin’ in the Rain and Carrie Fisher, daughter of the king of the generation, Eddie Fisher, a beautiful and confident girl who became the dream girl of many teenagers in the 1970s and 1980s, although of course, if still seen in today’s light, Amidala’s genetics clearly do not reflect much.

Harrison Ford was not intended to be used by Lucas because he had worked with him in American Pictures, but he only came to help out with the actors who auditioned for Han Solo, but it was only after Lucas realised that Harrison Ford knew the lines so well that the role was his that the little known Hollywood carpenter Harrison Ford took to the road to superstardom The most popular Han Fury character in Star Wars is undoubtedly Han Fury. There is no doubt that Star Wars’ most popular character, Han Solo, was made possible by Harrison Ford’s bold and confident portrayal. Star Wars has always been a film that has produced superstars, but at the time the company itself was not able to insight. Faced with three new faces with little name recognition, Fox wanted someone with substance to play Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi. Lucas, who loved Japanese cinema, had his own plans, as the word Jedi came from his love of Japanese period dramas (JIDAIGEKI), and Toshiro Mifune, whose experience working with Akira Kurosawa had intrigued him, turned down the Star Wars offer and Lucas had to choose someone else. The British star Eric Guinness, who had won an Oscar for his performance in Katsura and Bridge in 1958, was promoting his new film in Hollywood and was surprisingly interested in the role of Obi-Wan in the script on the condition that he would take 2.5% of the 40% box office share, an exorbitant offer which Lucas accepted. The role of Obi-Wan Kenobi was finalised.

His character, David Paulus, was obviously much poorer than his on-screen role as the Sith Lord Darth Vader. As the British champion weightlifter he was offered the role but the voice was not his own and by the time the film was closed he did not know that Darth Vader’s voice would be played by James Jones, and it is common sense to understand why he was so upset when he knew the truth. The line “I’m your father” in the later EP5 The Empire Strikes Back is not in the script, and Lucas doesn’t even reveal that he’s playing David, but only changes it at the end of the film in collaboration with a few staff members who know what’s going on. However, in EP6 Return of Jedis, when it was easy to remove the mask to show his head and face, it was replaced with Sebastian Shaw’s lookalike ……

In addition to Lord Black, there are three other characters who are only heard but not seen in the film: R2-D2, the binary language, C-3PO, the nagging etiquette droid, and Indiana Chopaka, the Wookiee, whose catchphrase is “Ho-ho”. The actor playing Chopaka, Pete McHugh, was originally just a caretaker in a London hospital, and when the 2’1″ tall man stood up in front of Lucas, he got the part. The casting of the robots was much more difficult, as real robots are not capable of handling the complex acting parts in the film given the real state of technology, and actors had to be cast to play them. Luckily, the cast eventually recruited extraordinaire Kenny Baker, whose vast acting experience and physical strength helped him to perform all sorts of actions in the barrel, and R2-D2 was brought to life as a cute robot. Once again in London, Lucas also found the robot C-3PO, who was professionally trained as a mime (how wide is the gap between mime and long-tongued?) of stage actor Anthony Daniels. Daniels, who has no interest in the science fiction genre, has no interest in a character who has been unable to show his true colours on screen all this time.

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