A man is seen walking towards a motel with a woman.
Other than a few kisses nothing to be concerned about.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


At the end of the film, old Frank sitting in front of the sanatorium asked his lawyer to be present in a sober manner in the face of the FBI’s inquiry. The young man opposite was stunned and told Frank that his lawyer had died. Frank asked subconsciously:

“Who did it?”

The gangster killer, who has lived a bloody life for half his life, has long forgotten the most basic natural rules of life, age, illness and death. The stress response under this occupational disease triggered the most orderly laughter of the audience, and also made Frank understand his situation: it turned out that everyone else was dead. A vast and chaotic era has passed. His enemies, his friends, the people he betrayed and the people he wants to protect have all turned into ashes, or a name unknown to contemporary people in the old newspaper. Frank is the only one left to tell his past legends to an unnamed audience.

When I was a child, I read that Huang Chang had studied martial arts for revenge for 40 years, but when I came out of the mountain, I found that all my enemies had died. I always felt sad and inexplicably relieved. No matter in the Jianghu where people are happy with gratitude and hatred, or in the gang world where conspiracies are surging, whether you are a martial arts master or a gang leader, the ultimate enemy you have to face in the end is time and the little self who doesn’t know where to go after time is washed away.

As early as 2008, Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro intended to bring Charles Bronte’s 2004 crime memoir “I heard you painted your house” to the screen, but at that time, no film company was willing to invest such a high budget in an era gangster film that didn’t sell well. Over the past decade, Martin and others have invested up to US $160 million in Netflix, as well as the technological progress of “de aging”, so that he can freely and deeply discuss the theme of time in the Irish.

The Irish is a very Martin Scorsese film. On the one hand, it marks Martin’s return to the gangster theme he is most passionate about and perhaps best at, and undertakes the poor streets, the situation in Las Vegas, the gangster in New York, and of course, the good guy, which is generally regarded as one of Martin’s best works; On the other hand, the Irishman continues Martin’s discussion of divinity and redemption in his works such as the last temptation of Christ and silence.

The film begins with a long push-pull lens. With the “in the still of the night” in the radio, our eyes shuttle through the hall and corridor of the nursing home, and finally come to the back of a wheelchair. The old man in the wheelchair is frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro), the “Irish” in the title. He wears a huge gold ring, gray hair on his head, and his speech is vague. He looked straight at the camera and recalled a road trip in 1975 as if he were in a documentary interview.

In the car that was destined for Detroit, frank, his second wife Irene, and Russell bufalino (Joe Percy), Frank’s best friend, were sitting in the car. When passing a gas station, Frank recalled his first meeting with Russell there and pulled the story back to 1950, the beginning of his “house painting” road.

The Irishman moves forward slowly under such a three-tier narrative structure. In 1950, Frank was a skilled World War II veteran. He met Russell as a truck driver and gradually became the most reliable thug and killer in the bufalino family power network and Russell’s good friend. Through Russell, Frank was recommended to union president and politician Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino) to become his bodyguard and most trusted right-hand man. After repeated assassinations, gun abandonment, body dumping and car bombs, the timeline from 1950 intersected with 1975. The car drove to the climax of the story, a wall waiting to be painted and the most important killing in Frank’s life.

Such a complex narrative structure and a large number of branch characters put forward ultra-high requirements for the audience’s attention, and Martin’s excellent control over images and sports made the three-and-a-half-hour film not half painful. In a push-pull shot from the barber shop, the character walks out of the barber shop into the busy shops and aisles, and then gives the viewpoint to the killers who enter the space. We naturally follow the killers to the barber shop where the target is located, but the next second the gunshot rings, the shot moves to a large cluster of flowers in the florist window. When Frank’s daughter Peggy was bullied by the shopkeeper of the grocery store, Frank beat the shopkeeper in the street in front of Peggy. This process is shown in a panoramic lens, which delays the time for Peggy to respond to the lens, and this powerful violence also marks the change of Peggy’s attitude towards his father and finally points to the tragedy of the father daughter relationship.

In addition to the blood and violence that stimulate the nerves, Martin also used the wonderful comic timing to reduce the rigidity and seriousness of the text. The plot before frank killed crazy Joe on the way to the family dinner is a very humorous psychological activity of choosing a gun; When explaining to the audience who Hoffa is, Frank said: “in the 1950s, Hoffa was as famous as Elvis Presley. But in the 1960s, maybe I have to say, he was like the Beatles.”. In the Irish, several important bloody and violent scenes are presented in a calm and restrained way. They don’t even give any close-up of the murderer frank, can’t see his expression, and don’t know what he was thinking at that moment. Instead, all the wine table conversations and all the jokes are given enough emotion.

Another very Scorsese feature of the Irish is a large number of historical nodes and conspiracy theories. The original work of the Irish is a memoir of Frank Sheeran, which provides the richest material for Martin, a lover of political conspiracy theory. So in the Irish, we see the behind the scenes manipulation of the Philadelphia gangs to help Kennedy win the presidency, the corruption and internal struggle of the trade union chairman, the power layout and assassination of the Kennedy family, “the bay of pigs incident”, and the most puzzling truth of Jimmy Hoffa’s disappearance.

Frank claimed to be involved in most of the above events. Like the dark version of Forrest Gump, he appeared at the right time and place, witnessing various turning points in American history. However, it is worth noting that these materials may only be old Frank’s boasting. After all, all other parties have been buried, and it is impossible to judge how true his words are. Most importantly, Frank admitted to killing Hoffa in the book, but the investigation in the real world did not find any evidence pointing to him. With these stories judged as rumors by many historians, Martin restored every detail in Frank’s memory with a kind of indescribable determination. On the one hand, Martin may be infatuated with Frank’s legendary life, but on the other hand, this may also be Martin’s clear distinction between story and history, fiction and reality as a mature narrator.

But at a deeper level, the Irishman may be a very Martin Scorsese film.

I’ve never liked “good guy”. The sentence “I wanted to be a gangster since I was a child” has an inexplicable conceit. Although Henry, the protagonist of “good guy”, has experienced ups and downs from beginning to end, he has no empathy. However, the Irish completely broke Martin’s portrayal of gang members like rock stars in good guys. These old guys in the Irish seem to be ordinary people, without being surrounded, dramatic action or happy BGM. Outside the business field, they are just a group of people wearing short sleeved shirts sitting by the bowling court, Middle aged and elderly people who look ordinary.

This humanized and life-oriented treatment of gang members completely negates the false romance often found in the theme of crime. The professional killers and political bigwigs in the Irish can easily discuss the major events of changing the power structure in hotel rooms wearing home pajamas and brushing their teeth. Al Pacino’s Hoffa is charming and infectious on the stage. When he gets off the stage, he is just an ordinary person with a bad temper, who likes hot dogs and ice cream and doesn’t like others to be late. Joe Percy used a paragraph “funny how?” Created a classic neurotic gangster image that people love and fear, but his performance in the Irish is extremely restrained. Russell is always calm in important business conversations, constantly considering his words. In life, he is a loving old man who talks about his wife smoking and is depressed because the goddaughter Peggy doesn’t like himself.

The “Irish” Frank played by De Niro undertakes the task of humanizing gang members at most. This role brings the discussion of gangs into the family, focusing on how these bloodthirsty outlaws and their criminal acts affect the next generation. In the Irish, whose female characters are seriously marginalized, Frank’s daughter Peggy is an impressive highlight. She has no lines, but her fear, doubt and final hatred of her father are directly projected on frank with several eyes, making his legendary experience seem empty and ridiculous.

After Peggy refused to talk to frank, frank, who was almost at the end of his life, washed his behavior to another daughter who was not close: “I just want to protect you from harm.” The daughter asked jokingly, “who won’t hurt you?” This sharp problem is to give all criminals who rationalize their behavior a loud slap in the face and break all the dreams of gangster romantic imagination.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here