The ladies’ costumes are all very low-cut and nearly revealing in many cases throughout the movie.


Porthos brings three prostitutes to make love to him and Aramis, but Aramis is busy praying. Porthos tells the girls, “He is hung like a donkey.” One replies, “So are you.”
Porthos and Aramis have a fairly explicit conversation about the importance of women’s breasts in the overall scheme of things.


While D’Artagnan is attempting to find the King and persuade him that Athos’ son shouldn’t be sent to the front lines, he hears the King in one of his apartments having relations with a woman in his bed.


Porthos is seen frolicking with 3 women in a pile of hay in a barn. He also makes a metaphorical reference to impotence by saying that his “sword is bent” and one of the women says that she can straighten if for him. Shortly after, you see his nude buttocks three times, including one time when he is bent over with his buttocks pointed straight at the camera.


The king is seen in bed with a woman apparently having just finished having sex. He leaves the bed and the woman is seen sitting up, apparently nude, but covering herself with the sheet.


The king is seen in bed with a woman who is clearly nude above the waist and her arm is strategically placed to obstruct the view of her breasts.
Porthos interrupts the business of a brothel to have the ladies do some sewing for him. In the process several semi-clad men are seen leaving. Porthos tells the women to get to work except for one that he singles out apparently to have sex with while the others work.
Some kissing.
We see Queen Anne during childbirth.

It is learned that the Queen Mother has had children as a result of an affair. And we see the affair has been carrying on for quite some time.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


I only saw half of the film. The fact is that even if I only saw half of it, I was completely surprised and dissatisfied, because I watched it from the perspective of Alexandre Dumas P è re and from the perspective of the original works I have seen countless times. From this point of view, I don’t think I should watch this film…

The film adapts a story in the third part of Dumas’s famous novel the Three Musketeers – Aramis intended to support Louis XIV’s twin brother “iron faced man” Philip to replace Louis XIV, and finally failed. Objectively speaking, this is actually a conspiracy. At this time, Aramis is no longer the young man with love affairs in the first novel. In his carefully planned palace conspiracy, Philip is only a big stepping stone to help him ascend the Pope’s throne. It was our Musketeer captain D’Artagnan who foiled the plot.

So when I watched the film with great expectation, I was very surprised to find that the conspiracy has become a just cause and a heroic feat. In addition, our noble Athos has become a sloppy and sad father, the upright Porthos has become a man of wine and meat, the beautiful schemer Aramis has become a serious and rigid “cult leader” (if the Jesuit is a cult… ||), and the clever and brave Musketeer D’Artagnan has talked about love with the Empress Dowager

Obviously, the screenwriter wants to tell us a strange story of justice, about heroes, about love, or more correctly, first love, then justice.

Then I’m really happy for Aramis, because he doesn’t have to be exiled to distant Spain for the failure of this story; I am also happy for Athos, because he can live so tenaciously after the death of his beloved son Raoul de bragelonne; I’m happy for Porthos, because he didn’t die alone in the cave of beautiful island. On the huge mausoleum chosen by God for him according to his figure, Aramis didn’t have to write his friend’s epitaph with his tears; I’m more happy for D’Artagnan, because he got the love of proud Austrian Anna, which she refused to give to the infatuated Duke of Buckingham. Especially for D’Artagnan, the words “love” were completely insulated from him after the lovely Constance died

The king’s switch scheme, a rigorous and exciting conspiracy that greatly depicts the details in the original work, has become an easily realized feat in the film. It is not even as long as describing D’Artagnan’s love. I don’t remember how the Musketeers rescued Philip from the Bastille prison in the film. It seems that Aramis has a big stomach (… My beautiful Aramis…), Then he transferred the prince out… What else should we say in the second half of the film? I couldn’t think of it, and I didn’t want to see it anymore at that time, so I washed and went to bed.

After many years, I seem to understand what the film wants to say – a touching love across identity (D’Artagnan and the Empress Dowager…), And the original piece used as a gimmick and main line to give the four warriors a chance to shout the slogan “all for one, one for all”, although this piece has been beyond recognition… The screenwriter and director want to cry for love or cheer for the hero.

So, my advice is, if you are a fan of the original, then don’t go to see the film, you won’t regret it.

If you want to see the wonderful performance of four old heroes, in other words, if you are a fan of Jeremy Irons, John Malkovich, G é rard Depardieu and Gabriel Byrne (I believe they have a lot of fans, and I am one of them), don’t read the original, don’t read it before or after. Remember.

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