The male slaves wear only loincloths.
A Hebrew slave woman is presented to two princes as a gift. She is wearing a midriff-bearing outfit. The princes proceed to haze her in what could be considered sexual harassment. (Also, some of the Egyptian “extras” wear similarly revealing outfits, but most don’t.)
Moses washes near the intrusive aid of some old women and clearly doesn’t want them there. We then briefly see him standing there with a small cloth/towel covering his groin until a robe is put around him.
In the morning scene after their wedding, a clothed Tzipporah is seen sleeping under covers. A clothed Moses kisses her and says “I love you” before exiting.
Some of the paintings/reliefs depict fleeting nudity, mostly during the dream sequence. Most of them are male infants (whose genitals are just apparent enough to make their gender evident), and at least one adult female (whose breast is showing, though not readily apparent). These are typical of ancient Egyptian art.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


After reading this story, I have an unspeakable taste in my heart.

In the sense of the Tao, Moses did so much to liberate the Hebrews. When he was still a prince of Egypt, he was shocked by the painful contradiction caused by his identity. Finally, he insisted on his faith and fulfilled his mission according to God’s will.

But I’m upset.

Unfortunately, it seems that Moses is not very capable. He just repeatedly declares that he is an angel arranged by God. He does not need to rely on his own strength to resist. Everything is protected by God. He just needs to convey God’s will and how to implement it. Just stand aside and watch. This mission is really easy. In fact, God liberated the Hebrews, but Moses, as a man, became the leader of the Hebrews. It seems that the identity of Moses is only a symbol of God on earth.

Unfortunately, the Egyptian royal family has caused countless bloody killings, and God’s punishment for the Egyptian royal family finally killed the eldest sons of all innocent Egyptian people overnight. The practice of cutting off children and grandchildren and curbing violence with violence is really shocking.

Unhappy third, the brotherhood between Moses and Ramses. From a broad perspective, their foothold is diametrically opposite, and the contradiction will inevitably turn into hatred. But from the perspective of two people, Moses’ betrayal of his brother is enough to make Ramses sad. Finally, Ramses’ long sigh on the shore was no longer a hatred for the endless pain brought by Moses to the Egyptian people, but a call to brothers. It’s sad.

In the final analysis, Ramses was only a victim of that era. He was the Pharaoh of Egypt and shouldered the responsibility of Egypt. Moses, of course, was much luckier than Ramses, because he was blessed by God from birth.

People’s fate is doomed. Such a story is really speechless.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here