A man attempts to force a woman to kiss with him.


Some suggestive dialogue from two overseers both lusting after the same Hebrew slave woman. One of them sexually harasses her and at one point tries to take her as his own. He taunts the Hebrew man she loves, saying he would have only kept her for a little while and then would have returned her “more worthy”, insinuating that the overseer wanted sexual rights to her before letting her be with her true love.


A man coerces a woman into becoming his concubine. Nothing graphic is shown, but the truth of her position is heavily implied, especially in the suggestive way he makes her dress (including form-fitting, cleavage-revealing dresses), and when she speaks of being dead to her people as an object of shame.
Some suggestive dialogue from a man to the woman he is pledged to marry: they do not love one another, and the man is clear about what he expects: that she will be his possession and she will come to him whenever he calls, whether she enjoys it or not, though he suggests that she might – sexual expectations are implied.


Many men are bare-chested and wearing kilts.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


“The laws of Moses are recognized as the sacred source of justice” (Edward Gibbon: the decline of the Roman Empire, Chapter 44 “jurisprudential thought”). Ten Commandments can be said to be the principle and cornerstone of the law of Moses. I first came into contact with the Ten Commandments when I was a freshman in college. At that time, I thought they were very naive and matched the ancient Egyptian era 3500 years ago that we were told or imagined. I was ashamed to think about the law of Moses in those days. The reason is that I childishly believed that modern civilization is better than ancient civilization, modern people are more enlightened and wise than the ancients, and lengthy provisions are more learned than concise commandments.

Fortunately, I don’t think so now. Tolstoy once said through his characters that all ideas that produce great results are very simple. The ten commandments are such simple things. The ten commandments are simple, plain, concise and clear. They are full of common sense derived from nature and reflect the justice that everyone can understand. Most importantly, the ten commandments are closely related to our lives, because the sins it summarizes are always with us, and each of us may become the perpetrators and victims of sins. It is these sins that have caused misfortunes and disasters in our lives to a great extent, and the greatest sin is that the perpetrators of evil deeds can not be punished and stopped. The ten commandments are intended to improve the world and promote happiness by stopping and punishing evil. With a spirit of moderation and peace, the Ten Commandments help us avoid disasters and misfortunes and live a life of security, freedom, peace and dignity.

Some scholars call some provisions of the Ten Commandments the early declaration of human rights. When I first heard this statement, I was not used to it, but gradually I felt that it was very appropriate.

“Do not kill.” It can be understood that people have the right to life;

“Do not steal.” “Do not covet a man’s house, or love another man’s wife, maidservant, ox, donkey, or other things.” The owner has property rights;

“Do not give false testimony to harm others.” A man has the right of reputation

Human thoughts can be expressed in different ways. Sometimes our understanding of the human rights we cherish may be too narrow. We often think that it can only be expressed in the set of terms we are used to. We think that it originated from the humanistic thought of ancient Greece. I think the declaration of human rights is nothing more than the embodiment of human beings’ desire for security, freedom, peace and dignity. This desire is innate. It is earlier than ancient Greece and the Magna Carta of England in 1215. The greatness of the ancient Greeks is that they provided a series of words and expressions for this desire. These words and expressions accurately and accurately explained this desire, and have been accepted and familiar by people today.

The United Nations Universal Declaration of human rights, published in 1948, is new in that it, for the first time, comprehensively and clearly expresses the human ideal of establishing a free, just and peaceful society and the determination to safeguard everyone’s dignity in a set of terms we are familiar with and used to. However, this ideal and determination is not new. They are almost as old as human society and exist in ancient books of many nationalities in written form, including the Bible, especially the law of Moses and the ten commandments. These classics must have inspired the drafters of the declaration directly or imperceptibly. A Chinese scholar who participated in the writing of the Universal Declaration of human rights later recalled that when he was engaged in this work, he got a lot of inspiration from Confucian classics. (Southern Weekend, December 2008)

The film ten commandments, made in 1956, describes the context of the ten commandments. Maybe it was the characteristic or common fault of Biblical films in that era. The expression and action of actors were rigid and unnatural, and today’s audience (including myself) were not used to it. Fortunately, the film is spectacular, colorful and pleasing to the eye. On the whole, it is still worth seeing. In particular, in the scene of “Moses led the Israeli people out of Egypt”, its special effects not only won the Oscar for best special effects in that year, but also made people admire it today. More importantly, in terms of spirit and content, the film also has extraordinary spirit. It starts with a biblical scripture:

“God commanded, ‘let there be light,’ and the light appeared.”

The film emphasizes the connection between the ten commandments and freedom. In my DVD collection, there is a section recording a speech delivered by director Cecil B. DeMille on the theme of the film: “… Should it be the law of God or the whims of dictators that rule mankind? Is man the property of the country or the free creatures under the custody of God?…” at that time, it was the cold war, and this passage not only had eternal significance, It is also full of the flavor of the times. The director is proud to say that the film tells the birth of freedom. In the film, the battle between Charlton Heston version of Moses and baldheaded Yul Brynner version of Pharaoh is like the cold war. It is not only a contest between two giants and two groups, but also a confrontation between two opposing values. The experience of Pharaoh and Egypt also revealed to the world as a fable: if authoritarian rule is not improved in time and knows how to compromise, then disaster will come.

At the end of the film, there is no freedom without law (there is no freedom without law) loudly summarizes the ten commandments and even the relationship between law and freedom. A few years ago, I read a Harvard Law School admonition to graduates: treat the law as “a wise constraint, which makes people free.” Both mean the same thing.

The law here, of course, is not the “whimsy” labeled as law by the powerful and powerful. “An unjust law is not law at all” (Augustine). It can only be natural law that conforms to the norms of justice and humanity, such as the ten commandments.

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