A man grabs a package of condoms to sleep with two women. He does not end up doing this.
A woman is briefly shown wearing a bikini.


A man makes obscene gestures with his tongue at two women.
A man grabs his private parts as two women pass him on the road.
Two female characters kiss toward the end. You cannot really see mouths touching.

A man tries to rape one of the lead characters. He lifts her skirt revealing her thighs. He tries to rip her top. He turns her over and lifts her skirt revealing her panties. He then pulls down her panties before it is interrupted.
There is a sex scene that lasts about 10 seconds. You see Thelma panties from the front and back. They are shirtless from the shoulders up.
A man asks two women if they ready for a big dick.
One of the women is on a bed with a man above her. The scene is very sensual, and it is implied later they slept together.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Speaking of Ridley Scott’s classic Thelma & Louise (hereinafter referred to as “the end”), many fans may first think of generalizing it in terms of “road film” or “feminism”. Indeed, as a typical road movies, this film “the end” released in 1991 is undoubtedly a wonderful flower among them. However, if we want to talk about its most unique place, “feminism” is more than its genre itself. In this female film with Thelma and Louise as heroines, we can see that all the male characters before and after are actually “affiliated”, and also cover a lot of sociological meanings. This is just like the footnotes under each page of those obscure academic works: the existence of each character in the end is a symbol of women’s status and many social phenomena at that time.

The appearance of Louise and Thelma

I remember at the beginning of the film, when the two heroines appeared, it can be said that almost every flashed scene was trying to show the social status of women at that time: Louise was a single woman, working as a waitress in an ordinary small restaurant; Thelma is an ordinary housewife. When Louise called, she was busy tidying up the table and preparing breakfast and coffee for her husband. At this time, Darryl, the first major male character in the film, appeared. Once he appeared, he immediately did the following things to his wife Thelma: first, he hated Thelma shouting at him; Second, he doesn’t care that Thelma prepares dinner for him at all; Third, it made Thelma, who wanted to tell him about his trip, finally give up the idea; Finally, he showed off his career to her, that is, regional manager. As a result, we can see that after “treating his wife as usual”, Darryl fell on all fours when he went to pick up the car. This may be a small “prank” deliberately played by director Scott on the patriarchal society.

At the same time, while presenting the above scenes, we can also see several meticulous scenes showing Louise and Thelma. For example, Louise, who kept smoking in the restaurant, didn’t forget to tidy up the wash table before leaving at home. For example, Thelma carefully took all kinds of defensive items (including the pistol) before going out alone for the first time. These scenes of women’s tenderness are in sharp contrast to Thelma’s husband’s previous behavior, but they are still covered under the patriarchal society; Even though Thelma proudly told Louise in the car that she didn’t tell her husband about the trip, the next line still reflected the social status of women who were tied to the yoke of household distribution – “I left him a note and I left him dinner in the microwave.”

Dead Harlan

After Louise and Thelma arrived at a bar called “silver bullet” on the way, the second main male character in the film appeared. Perhaps after a little attention, we will find that when detective Hal asked the restaurant waitress, through the waitress’s brief description, we can understand that the deceased Harlan was a man who often tried to play with women and had a tendency to violence, which symbolized the most common problem for women in the patriarchal society, namely sexual harassment and sexual violence.

When Harlan attempted to rape Thelma, Louise’s timely arrival stopped the act; Just as Louise and Thelma were about to turn around and leave, Harlan’s insult (representing discrimination against women) aroused Louise’s anger, so in a rage, Louise shot Harlan. Here, we must also explain the background of the heroine Louise: Louise had the experience of being raped earlier. The man who raped her was shot dead by Louise because of Louise’s fear and anger. Harlan in the film is actually the second person killed by Louise. That’s why the detective named Hal quickly tracked down Louise’s model from the computer records. Hal can be said to be the only man in the film who really knows Louise (here represents all women). I think we’ll talk about this later.

J. D. and Jimmy

On the way of Louise and Thelma’s escape, two male roles important to Louise and Thelma staggered on the stage. If we calculate a little, we can see that the director and screenwriter consciously let the two characters appear alternately at the same time, and this was carried out three times: the first time, Louise called her ex boyfriend Jimmy to borrow money, Jimmy readily agreed and told him the location, and then J.D. appeared; The second time, Thelma begged Louise to take the J.D. he met again, and then met Jimmy at Louise’s destination for a long time; The third time, while Louise and Jimmy were talking next door, J.D. came to Thelma’s room again. At this time, we can see that Louise and Jimmy quarrel; After Thelma accepted J.D.’s overnight request, director Scott began to describe the “new and old” sex in the two rooms. Many fans may think that this is an attempt to express men’s satisfaction and respect for women’s sex. In fact, it is not. This is precisely a reflection of the general situation that sex between women and men is materialized, used, and even cheated in today’s society. This is the “real intention” of the two individual roles of J.D. and Jimmy.

Through the dialogue between the characters in the film, it is not difficult to see that Jimmy is very eager to make up with Louise – this is actually an annotation of men’s strong possession of women, and J.D. is also eager to meet Thelma – this is actually a deception of women’s sex (for Jimmy’s money). Maybe it’s because Jimmy also has a serious tendency to violence, and Louise has been raped. The latter has always refused to start a new life with Jimmy. After being cheated of money by J.D., Thelma watched Louise cry, and she began to be smart. After using the method J.D. told her, Thelma succeeded in robbing the required amount from a convenience store with a gun, which was unexpected to Louise. Thelma’s move represents women’s venting of patriarchal oppression – women can enjoy equal pay with men. Although Thelma gets money through illegal activities, at the same time, we also know that J.D. is also a thief who lives on deception and robbery. In this way, Thelma’s behavior is equal to that of J.D; Thelma (female) also proved her ability to J.D. (male).

Thelma’s husband Darryl

As for Thelma’s husband Darryl, a neurotic man who doesn’t forget to vent his anger on Thelma when he leaves every morning, he finally shed tears and regretted. I remember that in the middle of the film, the director and screenwriter seemed to specially arrange a humorous dialogue between Darryl and Hal to satirize men’s oppression of women: just when Hal asked Darryl to friendly ask Thelma about the situation, Darryl’s kind “hello” made Thelma hang up the phone and see through the situation, Only Hal was left stunned; At this time, Hal can only tell Hal helplessly: “I… I just said hello to her…”

Detective Hal

I still remember that I mentioned earlier that Hal is the only male character (perhaps more Louise) who really understands and sympathizes with Louise and Thelma in the whole film. As a detective whose duty is to investigate the truth, Hal’s symbolic meaning represents the justice and conscience of the legal and judicial system and society, which is also the focus of controversy in the end. Many critics question Scott’s feminist road film because in their view, the law is above all else; Even if Louise and Thelma were bullied and even humiliated by many male characters in the film, this is not enough to constitute the reason for the legal and social forgiveness of their sins. At least, Louise also killed two men in a row. This seems to be ridiculed and disdained by director Scott with the seemingly wonderful “jump” at the end.

Indeed, if only from the point of view of expression, Scott may have such mistakes; Perhaps according to the words of many male filmmakers, Louise and Thelma’s behavior in the film is indeed “crazy and inhumane”, but I think this is not enough to deprive us of their rational value. What’s more, those opponents also misunderstood the director’s intention of some means of expression!

Let’s start with detective Hal. At the end of the film, in addition to the above impressive scene, if we are still impressed, the scene of detective Hal chasing the audience alone in the dust must also be very touching. Just as other policemen were ready to pull the trigger and shoot two crazy heroines, Hal’s cry became the most real emotional expression in the whole “end”: “they have been bullied for many years!” (How many times has she got to be fucked over!) Indeed, women’s rights and interests should be protected by law and all sectors of society. Here, I think the intention of the director and screenwriter is not to try to make the law tolerate or even pardon the sins of Louise and Thelma (individual), but to hope that the whole society will change its ideas one day and realize the beautiful expectation of social equality between men and women, which is also the meaning of Louise and Thelma driving out of the cliff – a beautiful vision for the future.

It can be seen that Hal respects women very much in the central films; When he asked the previous bar waitress, he was also very focused. Even after watching the waitress representing women gradually being “commercialized” tease him, Hal still acted impartially and did not accept the invitation of the former, which was also out of respect and sympathy. It can be seen that the director did not try to vent the imperfection of the law and the insufficient protection of women’s rights and interests. On the contrary, he respected and hoped to follow the law itself. And that’s what this movie is all about.

Unfortunately, although the end showed the audience the beauty of women and the desire to achieve equality, Louise and Thelma finally left us. Looking back on the whole film, from Thelma’s attachment to Louise in every way at the beginning to her initiative to “let’s go on”, we can see that Thelma finally completed a growth of herself. Thelma represents women’s innocence, liveliness, loveliness and wisdom. In contrast, Louise represents women’s maturity, strength, independence and unyielding. Thanks to the mutual help, understanding and support of Louise and Thelma, director Scott and screenwriter Callie Khouri praised women, moved the audience and made people think deeply.

In a word, crazy flower at the end of the road is really a good film worthy of its name. Perhaps, when Louise and Thelma flew down the cliff with happy tears; When Hal enthusiastically cries and calls for them, what he gets will be the attention and awakening of the whole society.

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