Lots of sexual conversation some of it quite descriptive referencing orgasms, oral sex(referred to as “s**king c*ck”), erections(referred to as “hard-on”), and ejaculation(referred to as “coming”). A man tells a married woman that for 14 years he “wanted to eat her p**sy.”
There are several scenes of naked men and women in bed together but we don’t see any nudity. In one scene, a woman is lying on top of a man and moving her waist to caress him(seen from a distance and not very graphic). In another scene, it is clear that the couple is in the process of having sex but movement is very limited.
We see a few women in bras and slips.
Lots of kissing and some caressing much of it between a man and his mistress.
A married woman takes off her top and tells a man that she wants to make love to him. We only see her from the back in a bra and we don’t find out what happens.
A man takes off his wife’s jacket to have sex with her in a parking garage. All nudity is blocked by cars and the scene is very brief.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Unreal, yet so real
The editing is marvelous. There is no distinct story line but a melange of action, reflection and imagination that convoluting into a story of a semi-dream. A hopeless romantic, a man who has it all having a sensual affair with his secretary, this is the oldest plot in the book, but the twist that the object of his lust is a woman with a plain look and a low self-esteem piques viewers’ interest instantly.

The quasi-somniloquy conversation between lovers and the cinéma vérité soliloquy ask, also prod the viewers to ask the antique questions of “what is love” and “why are you”. “It is about love, it is not cheery,” an innocent voice reminds viewers in the film. No, it is not cheery. It is passionate; it is agonizing; it is racy; it is self-doubting;it is tender, and it is also tempestuous. The overlapping of different time and different places combining with the inconsistency of characters’ sometimes amusingly direct remarks and other times meandering philosophical-like dialogs has the ring of ridicule. Fortunately the film is soaked in Schubert’s music, whispering it is a romance comedy after all.

Russell said, “caution in love is the most fatal to true happiness” I have some admiration for a man chasing a leaving bus, but the ironic ending put a damper on the dream. An reality check: there is a consequence for following your heart too much.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here