Men and women are seen in bathing suits.
Edwin lifts up a plastic doll’s dress to see if it is wearing any panties. He also grips the doll’s bare leg and jokingly makes faces at it.
A man calls his mother out for having conceived him in a hotel room with a man she didn’t know.

Edwin is told by his mother that “Baby Jane” as a young adult was found sleeping around with some guy, drunk, after the accident which paralyzed her sister. “In bed” is the phrase used so it isn’t particularly explicit.


Film review:Translated by www.rabudo-ru.com


Hitchcock’s Psycho was an unexpectedly huge success, and actress Janet Lee’s star shone brightly. But surprisingly, Lee passed up the opportunity to continue in the horror genre while the iron was hot in favour of trying other genre films. One was the political thriller The Manchurian Candidate, and the other was the song-and-dance comedy The Joy of Tonight. However, her vivacity and cleverness still conquered the audience. In fact, Lee’s acting career had a real affinity with horror films; she was 18 years old in 1946 and lived in central California. One day, her portrait was overlooked by Nauma Sheila, who had just retired to the area. Sheila’s ex-husband was Irving Throneberg. This man contributed much to the development of the American horror film.

“What a pretty face,” Sheila says to herself, looking at the frame on the check-in desk. Coincidentally, the owner of the hotel happened to be Lee’s father. He proudly presented the photo to Sheila. Sheila took the picture back to Hollywood and showed it to her partner Lou Wiseman. The latter had no idea at the time that this pretty little girl would later become a money spinner for them. Likewise, Lee had no idea that the actresses who were Sheila’s contemporaries would be reduced to making horror films. Mona Rao, Brett Godard, Merle O’Brien and many more had all starred in horror films in their prime years. But these exquisite products of the Hollywood star factory knew full well how difficult it was for them to stay glamorous while screaming in the film. “Back then, you had to show glamour in everything you did.” Says Robert Taylor, who has worked with them. “When Nauma Shira and Joan Crawford came out, it was like you were looking at big stars.”

A picture of Sheila is preserved in a poster in Marie Antoinette’s metal box from 1959. At 37, she looked in her twenties under the lens of photographer William Denisio. Sloanberg once told the photographer, “I don’t care how you set the light, as long as the actor looks pretty.” Outside the Beverly Hills villa, on the other hand, smoke shrouds and lights are dim. Inside the house, however, Sheila is 59 years old. She hasn’t shot a film in at least 18 years. What’s the reason? Simply because she knew that the illusion of youth created by lighting, filters or angles would only cover it for a moment, and that one day, when she was older, these aids would be useless. That day came in 1941. At that time she already had a vague sense that the marks of age were eating away at her beautiful close-ups. Only 41 years old, she knew that cinema would not tolerate excessive retouching. She opted out of acting. “A great actress should leave the audience with laughter and sadness.” She said at the time. One did not expect Sheila to choose to take a break from acting at the height of her power and career. Her image had been juxtaposed with that of “M-G-M”. The only way to preserve that image was to leave it on film. She did not want her grandmother’s image to be tarnished. And her collaborators, with the exception of the wealthy O’Brien, Godard and Garbo, could not afford such an extravagant resting place.

That same year, Mona Law was 54 and still making films. Bette Davis, aged 51, was going through what she later called the “black decade”. Although shortly before that period, she had made a splash in The Comet Beauty. At this time, however, she was making ends meet with character roles, television shows and the occasional stage play. Katharine Hepburn, aged 52, had not made a film in two years. Joan Crawford, 54, newly widowed. Alfrad Steele, the husband of a Pepsi executive, had just died, leaving her hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. She had to sell her home in Brandwood as a result, and also had to work for Pepsi. At the same time, it was also necessary to try to take on all sorts of quirky roles. A British producer had told her that a 3D film might be box office at the time. “I really didn’t want to do it,” Joan Crawford says, “and the strong character kept me going.” She also guest-starred in The Cold Warriors, acting with a group of young people. Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard is right in saying that Hollywood is indeed not interested in over-the-hill stars. But this dynamic is set to change with the arrival of a new cycle of horror films.

This cycle began with Katharine Hepburn. Producer Sam Spiegel is set to package Tennessee Williams’ drama Summer Surprise for Columbia and cast Elizabeth Taylor in the lead role. At the same time, he named Hepburn. The play was completed in 1957 by Williams and became a sensation. He used his drug-addicted characters to reflect his own fears and guilt. His greatest fears were overdosing on drugs and dying and homosexual promiscuity. His most unforgivable sin was agreeing with his mother to remove the white matter from his sister’s front lobe. Twenty years later, he still loves and hates his mother. And the result of the playwright’s internal struggle and introspection is Summertime Fright. The story is about Kaklovic, a brain specialist, who is pressured by the tyrannical noblewoman Venable to perform a lobotomy on her niece, Catherine, on the white matter of her front brain. When in fact she is only agitated and not really deranged. The price of the operation is a large sum of money for the hospital if the doctors can stop Katherine’s babbling (her words reveal the very mystery of the death of Lady Venable’s son Sebastian).

Spiegel wants Hepburn to play Madame Venable, but not to hang on to the headlining role. The seat was to go to Elizabeth Taylor, who played her daughter Catherine, the world’s number one box office star at the time. The last time Hepburn took the second seat was in 1933. Taylor wanted her best friend Montgomery Clift to play the role of the doctor. Although Clift was at a low point in his career at the time due to alcohol and drugs, he was still on par with Marlon Brando Paul Newman. There is a problem with insurance here though. If a star might suddenly be unable to fulfil his contract, a major company would not hire him. Spiegel was prepared to insure Clift’s physical health. The first time Clift missed his appointment. The second time he did show up, but again he was quiet and scary. The doctor muttered that he might be in a deep sleep and declared him uninsurable. In desperation, Spiegel used him anyway. After that, all the cast members flew to London, except the old fox Spiegel who went to the offices of the Hayes Code Authority and conned Geoffrey Sherlock, who turned out to be completely unimpressed with the film’s script, into getting the seal of approval.

Recalling that episode, Spiegel said, “Sexual perversion or any suggestion of it was forbidden,” and Sherlock informed him that the director, Joseph Mankiewicz, could not do that scene. Namely, Kathryn revealed that Sebastian had the superpower to use her and her mother to recruit young boys for a sex play episode. The episode comes from a flashback of Sey showing him realising that he is no longer young and has lost his superpowers. And the people he has played with, seeing his current weakness, rise up against him and punish him in a way that defies description. It is the story of a group of demons. Totalitarian mothers, cruel homosexuals, promiscuous criminals. To this, Sherlock is clearly unacceptable. Spiegel, on the other hand, was unconvinced and told Mankiewicz to start filming. At this point, the director is busy with Clift.

Even when sober, Clift was causing trouble. At one formal dinner party he was biting his own fingertips, throwing crockery around and babbling loudly. Taylor had tried to calm him down, but she was in trouble herself. A year earlier, a third husband, Mike Tedder, had died in a plane crash. Always in mourning, she had just married married married singer Eddie Fisher again. Mohandis McCambridge plays Taylor’s mother in the film. She recalls.

“Elizabeth, always missing McTurd. And Miss Hepburn was gripped by Quenser’s illness. The director, Mankiewicz, seemed to have a skin condition on his hands, so he always wore gloves. You can hardly imagine that screenwriters Vidal or Tennessee Williams would be are particularly happy people. Of course, Clift is suffering. Everyone associated with the film is going through their own suffering and it shows.”

Summer Surprise opened on 25 May 1959 at the studio in Spildon, fifty-five miles south-west of London. It was the height of summer and a heat wave was rolling in. To beat the heat, Clift brought his own thermos. It was filled with cool, fruity wine. Screenwriter Edward Amhert had the misfortune to take a sip, “What the hell is this?” He asked with a grin on his face.

“Bourbon, crushed painkillers, and fresh juice,” replied Clift with a smile.

Mankiewicz had been cold to Kreeft since the “dinner party” incident. Now, if he shakes, forgets a word, or blanks out, the director tells the producer to prepare a replacement. Spiegel asked Taylor to talk to Clift. “I tried, it didn’t work.” She replied. After that Hepburn volunteered to take on the task of looking after him. Mankiewicz didn’t like Hepburn, but began to get close to Taylor. “Mankiewicz seemed keen to win Elizabeth’s favour,” says Speed, “but he didn’t treat Katharine with enough respect.” Hepburn thought the director was too cruel to him for talking openly about ditching Clift. However, the personal issues that plagued the film backfired and made Taylor’s performance in front of the camera. Particularly the monologue in the climactic passage.

At the end of the ten-minute line, Taylor begins to cry. It can be described as genuine emotion. Her colleagues, who are in the audience, run up to her to comfort and encourage her. But she stops crying, pushes them away and runs into the dressing room alone.

One day, after finishing her performance, Hepburn approached the director, Mankiewicz, confronted him and asked, “Are you sure you’re done?” And repeated it three times. When he confirmed that no further reshoots were needed. Hepburn paused for a moment, then jumped up and slapped him. To show her displeasure with the director. He left immediately.

The film was officially released on 22 December 1959. The credit for this goes to Spyder. It was his decision to cut one line, one shot later, that finally set the Authority straight. The line was “We solicited a prostitute for him.” And the deleted scene was showing two bareback boys fondling each other. This censorship only seems to put on window dressing; it fools no one. “I reckon the youngest audience members sitting down there can understand what’s happening on the screen.” Pauline Kael once wrote. Indeed, they understood, and immediately ran off to tell their friends who had made the film. A similar thing happened with Psycho, one of the biggest selling films of 1960. Variety described Summer Surprise as, “one of the most grotesque films ever made by a major Hollywood company.” Suddenly in one summer (that phrase is the title of Summer Fright), two horror films pop up at once, and both have a creepy psychotic mother in them.

The insanity mania is the main point, and the writer Philip Wylie can be used as a symbol. He had attacked this mother-son relationship Williams now portrays in that much-talked-about book, The Malignant Generation, published in 1942. “O, Sebastian,” Mrs Venable said to her son. “What a wonderful summer, just the two of us. How lucky it should be to always be like this! To have each other and not need anyone else. Until forever.” The thought of a beautiful older woman dominating her aging son sent Willy into a certain exaggerated exuberance. “While we recognize American Idol beauties (All-American Dream Girls, Glamour Girls), we are insulting women and denying millions of women the right to love. To create the clutches of motherhood, to mock the burned-out residue of youth.”

Reprinted more than twenty times, The Wicked Generation had a great impact but also a mixed reputation. In particular, Willy slammed tens of millions of soldiers for having a fetish for motherhood and preferring to chat up pretty girls rather than pull them into the bush. “So who are they going to pull in? I created you” in Willy’s pair of “Bride of Frankenstein” professors …. Demon!” the warning that any mother of a healthy American male could turn her son into the next Sebastian is becoming louder and clearer, amidst the blunt, curse-like response of

“I made you, Mom,” Willy writes, “I made, this destructive mother!”

But Willy needn’t have bothered. Hollywood’s glamorous star is good enough to give lessons to the Monster of Frankenstein on and off screen.

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The next horror film to bring back the movie queens of the past, its back from the cover of a stale publication, was in 1961 when the producer of ABC’s thriller series, William Frye, discovered a novel called What Ever Happened to Baby Jane. The author’s name was Henry Farrell. The novel was packaged and recommended to Wiseman, along with Bette Davis and Olivier de Havilland, and director Ida Lupino. As a result Wiseman refused. This was because Davies had shown a love of nosiness when she made the Wagon Train series back then. Director Robert Eldridge had heard about the novel from his former secretary. Her new boss had just bought out the rights to the book. If Eldridge was interested, he could get it for $10,000.

Eldridge had previously directed Autumn Leaves, a suspenseful film starring Joan Crawford, in 1956. For a number of years afterwards, Crawford kept writing to say that she wanted to work with Davis on a film. Perhaps Crawford recalled the film The Big Lie. The supporting actress in the film, Mary Astor, not only stole Davis’ scenes, but also won an Oscar. Davis never wanted to work with any actress who might pose a threat to her again. She always distanced herself from Crawford and called her “an MGM mannequin.” According to Doyle Freeman, MGM’s press officer, who has known Crawford for fifty years, this hostile relationship has been a long time coming. “Bette Davis was a big star at Warner when Crawford entered the company in her forties. She didn’t take Crawford seriously at the time. But when Crawford got the little gold, she started stealing roles from it. Just as Thurman Sheila had done to Crawford at MGM. So the two began to be hostile to each other.” Despite this, Crawford pleaded with Eldridge. Saying that she still wanted to work with Bette Davis, and Eldridge later recalled, “I couldn’t imagine them working together, and then I saw Baby Jane.”

Eldridge sent the book to Crawford. At the time, she was selling Pepsi in New York. During that time, the rights to the book changed. An agent named Sid Beckman, bought out the book and gave it to Henry Essex, the writer of It Came From Outer Space, for adaptation. Eldridge insisted on the book, and Beckman offered $61,000. Eldridge didn’t have that kind of money, but his new producer, Josephine E. Levine, was willing to help him pay up front. In the end, Essex got 28,500, while Beckman got the rest and Eldridge got the rights – almost. Later, when a conflicted relationship broke down, Eldridge had to pay Levine $85,000 for the book, and the screenplay he and Lucas Heller had based on it. Now all he had to do was find two old witches with broomsticks to act in the play.

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